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LEISURE & HOSPITALITY FACILITIES THE SPORTS


FLOORING WAS DICTATED BY THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SPORTS AND LEISURE FACILITIES,


AND INFORMED BY SIR CHRIS HOY.


fittings allowed for fast and safe installation of the larger diameter pipes with minimal numbers of components stored on-site. MLCP is also form-stable, allowing the smallest possible bend radius, a reduced number of connections and, as a result, reduced liability. Crucially, this allowed it to be bent into shape according to the build requirements, making it flexible enough for the race track. Overall, more than 16,000m of Uponor pipework was installed.


The key challenge, however, was in project managing the construction of the climate heating system. In order to ensure that the construction elements would run smoothly when it came to the project build, the first three years involved continuous in-depth planning. It was absolutely vital that all parties involved were clear on how each aspect of the project would need to run once construction began. This included everything from determining the construction of the flooring area and ensuring precise placement of pipes and joints; to factoring in the drying time of a section of the floor resin before moving to the next area of track.


Multiple contractors worked on-site to competing deadlines. However, by working closely with the building designers and subcontractors, velta ensured that each element of the installation ran smoothly, and that the highest standards of quality were assured.


Thanks to the unique range of offerings and expertise in the Uponor portfolio, Uponor plumbing systems and velta underfloor heating solutions were delivered ahead of schedule and now form part of the lasting legacy of the Velodrome. As a result, and thanks to close co- operation with all of those involved in the project, the track was completed a full 18 months before the Games.


www.uponor.co.uk


www.tomorrowsfm.com


TOMORROW’S FM | 31


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