This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The Patient Prerogative


The washrooms at a doctor’s surgery, hospital or clinic have a significant impact on a patient’s general impression of the facilities themselves. Stephen Wright of Tork manufacturer SCA, looks at maintaining healthy washrooms that reassure patient.


Most of us in the UK have little choice about the hospitals we visit for an out-patient’s appointment or an A&E emergency. We tend to choose our GPs, too, for their location rather than on their other merits. So it could be said that doctors’ surgeries and hospitals have little need to impress their “customers” with smart, upmarket premises, but cleanliness is another matter. Most of us would be horrified if a healthcare waiting room we visited was visibly dirty, just as we would be appalled if the toilets were unhygienic or if they lacked


56 | HEALTHCARE & HOSPITAL HYGIENE


basic facilities such as soap, hand towels and toilet paper.


The washrooms at a hospital or a doctor’s surgery form only a very small part of the overall healthcare experience, of course, but patients care more than we may realise about the toilets in the healthcare facilities they attend, according to a survey carried out by SCA. More than eight out of ten of the 2,500 people questioned in our study felt that the washroom was an important or a very important factor in their overall impression of a doctor’s


office or hospital. A total of 76% also believed that if a hospital washroom were not clean, hygiene standards at the hospital or surgery itself would probably also be poor.


A GP practice needs to maintain a good reputation within the community it serves, otherwise it is unlikely to attract new patients – and this might have an impact on its funding. Similarly, the many private clinics and hospitals around the country need to present a professional image for their paying “customers”. Plus, NHS hospitals have a duty of care


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98