This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BICSc Breakthrough


The British Institute of Cleaning Science (BICSc) investigates the true value of cleaning operatives in improving standards in the NHS.


Despite eminent awareness, we regularly see a multitude of negative news articles appearing in the media scrutinising the NHS for its cleaning and hygiene standards. They tell stories of unfortunate individuals that have contracted deadly infections like MRSA, C.Diff and other related infections; aside from affecting the individuals themselves as well as their families, they have also led to heightened public concern of NHS standards and an increased pressure on the NHS to focus on improvements.


NHS Standardisation


And Procedure It would however be extremely unfair not to mention that there has been a significant increase in recognising preventable illness and improving standards within the NHS in recent years, particularly with the introduction of standardised procedures throughout UK hospitals.


In 2007, a National Specification for Cleanliness in the NHS was developed which not only introduced a set of cleaning standards, but also illustrated how to access performance against these standards. Among the standards championed by this document was a national colour-coding system that is now used across the NHS facility to help prevent cross-infection and contamination with cleaning materials. This simple system is easily understood by staff, proving particularly useful when language or literacy barriers exist (which can often happen within a diverse workforce).


Better Relationships,


Better Results If NHS cleaning operatives’ needs are understood, then improving working relationships and the


54 | HEALTHCARE & HOSPITAL HYGIENE


clarity of overall ‘bigger picture’ objectives, is much easier to achieve, and communication is key to this. Bearing in mind that most cleaning operatives don’t receive the usual communication channels that other staff receive, they are often not briefed on the overall objectives while the rest of the team are kept informed. Excluding operatives from this process can create barriers and leave them feeling isolated; by spending time regularly bringing cleaning operatives into the bigger picture, this will ensure that they feel valued, respected, part of the team, more confident in their work and able to voice their concerns.


Training And Education After standardised procedures and the improvement of staff relationships, the next step is ensuring that hospital cleaning operatives are educated well enough to actually understand and practice these standards. Unfortunately, this is where things can go very wrong. Another clear solution to reducing this risk is sufficient education as it ensures the safety of the operative, the building, and any other staff, visitors and patients within the building.


It is only through official (and trustworthy) accredited training providers and assessment criteria that the NHS can ensure that staff have not only undertaken training courses, but have thoroughly understood what they have learned and are competent in their abilities. Overall, staff accreditation benefits everyone; results have shown a reduction in health risks within the hospital, improved staff productivity, and an improved hospital reputation.


Accredited Training


Organisations (ATO’s) Whilst hiring an already accredited cleaning operative is ideal, an increasingly popular choice among hospitals (with a number of cleaning operatives onsite) is to become a BICSc Accredited Training Organisation (ATO). NHS ATO’s are hospitals that have members of their own onsite staff who have the ability to deliver BICSc training; after their own training, they become ‘licenced assessors’ with the ability to certificate other staff within the hospital, and the benefits of having such people on your team are numerous:


• The cost-effective delivery of training (once trained, licensed assessors can train staff free of charge)


• Raising standards via the education of staff


• Supporting succession planning


• Suitable skills for suitable environments


• Training can take place on locations suitable to business contracts/needs


• Evidence that your establishment has cleaning operatives that are trained to an accredited industry standard throughout the hospital.


In summary, the Institute recommends the following overall formula for improvements to handling infection control in the NHS:


Education +Accredited Training + NHS Cleaning Operatives = Infection Prevention and Control


www.bics.org.uk


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98