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established to help preserve the specific characteristics of herb-rich forests and esker forests on sunlit slopes.


Metsä Group participated in the WWF Environmental Paper Company Index comparison in 2013 for the first time in all product categories: pulp, board, graphic paper and tissue paper. It acts as a tool where companies report their environmental footprint openly, and the evaluation comprises the use of wood fibre sourced from sustainably managed forests, energy consumption and transparent operations.


3


Youth Employment Opportunities


In addition to their traditional cooperation with educational institutions, Metsä Group participated in a campaign to promote better working environments for future industry employees. The Finnish Forest Industry Federation started a national school campaign aimed to attract ninth graders to work and study in the forest sector. More than 200 employees from Metsä Group, Stora Enso, UPM and the Finnish Forest Association acted as ambassadors throughout Finland to share their experiences from the forest industry. Schools were also


given product samples from the industry, and were asked to design a job advertisement that would attract future employees to the forestry industry – the top prize being €10,000 for a class trip to be divided between seven classes.


4


Bioenergy Boost Katrinefors Kraftvärme AB, a joint


venture owned by Metsä Tissue and the local municipal energy company VänerEnergi AB, will be building a new biomass combined heat and power plant in Mariestad, Sweden, in conjunction with the Metsä Tissue mill. The new bioenergy production will reduce Mariestad mill’s oil usage by 90%, and will decrease the mill’s CO2


emissions by 25%. In


addition, the €30million investment will provide renewable energy for the surrounding community – with construction already well on the way, the plant is expected to be operating by the end of this year.


What’s On The Agenda? With all these examples to follow on from, Metsä Group make it clear that four key concerns will form their agenda for future operations. These are ideas we should all consider if we are to make a real impact on the industry as well as the planet, though, and they identify these as:


METHODS TO COMMUNICATE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT The various tools used to describe a product's environmental impacts and production chains do so in very different ways. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) typically contains all relevant emissions and resource use as well as the whole production chain from material procurement to product disposal. Other tools have a much narrower view.


To Create Well-Being To generate well-being at work, in local communities and in wider society, is crucial to our development as an industry, as well as committing to global sustainability principles. By behaving responsibly towards our employees and society, we can improve the quality of life of our stakeholders.


To Bring The Forest To You Our products come from sustainably managed forests; for every tree that is harvested, we make sure that new ones get planted for the coming generations. Together with our partners, we secure a sustainable supply of raw materials for our units and a supply of renewable products for our customers.


Think Small All human activity leaves a mark on the planet, and so does our production. What matters is using energy, raw materials and other resources efficiently and maintaining low levels of emissions and waste.


Offer Sustainable Choices Wood is an endlessly renewable resource – we turn wood into safe and recyclable products that improve quality of life. They are sustainable alternatives to many non-renewable products and raw materials, but more importantly, we know the exact environmental footprint of our products. Everyone should be willing to discuss this, and do so transparently.


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