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Metsä Make Their Mark


Back with another Sustainability Report, Metsä Group describe the challenges they’re facing and the changes they’re making for a better future.


The third of its kind, Metsä Group’s Sustainability Report 2013 focuses on the ever-developing sustainability aspirations of the company’s supply chain management and stakeholder practices. At the beginning of 2014, Metsä Group’s parent company, Metsäliitto Cooperative, celebrated its 80th anniversary. The Cooperative was founded in 1934 to promote the export of Finnish wood, and its mission to follow the principles of sustainable development has remained unchanged. Riikka Joukio, Senior Vice President for Metsä Group’s Sustainability and Corporate Affairs, commented: “One of Metsä Group’s main assets is that we cover the whole value chain from forest operations to tissue, board, paper, pulp and wood products. Today, there is a clear need for sustainable choices, and we are proud to say that our products enable our customers make these choices.”


One of their main accomplishments


was achieving the reduction in CO2 emissions in production by 30% per product tonne from the 2009 level.


CO2


The total reduction so far of 32%, has been made possible by the completed bioenergy investments over the past few years. Now, they are looking to aim even higher.


A Smart Move Growing global scarcity and competition for resources have raised the importance of resource efficiency – the efficient use of materials, energy and water, as well as the efficient re-use of waste and residuals. Riikka continued: “The forest industry can be used as a benchmark, since we utilise renewable wood raw material with high efficiency. Our bio-based products are an alternative that helps to save other fossil-based resources.”


Metsä Group has concentrated on a move towards improving energy and material efficiency for years, but they stress the importance of using raw materials in end-uses too, where they add the most value. Their aim now is to continue to develop processes already in place to become even more resource efficient and sustainable, but to further develop


EMISSIONS ALONG THE VALUE CHAIN


The value chain of wood-based products is largely paved with green renewable carbon recycling from forest to product and through product degradation to the atmosphere and back to new wood growth. Part of the wood material is used as bioenergy at the mills. The grey fossil emissions increasing the atmosphere's climate effect are smaller and come from transportation and energy production at the mills.


their reporting system as well. Sustainability is tightly integrated into all Metsä operations and strategies, thus their commitment to the ten principles of the UN Global Compact which highlight the respect for human and labour rights, environmental responsibility and anti-corruption, are a crucial part of their future considerations.


Case And Point –


Sustainability In Action Of course, it’s all well and good stating objectives and goals, but where is the proof of their leaps forward? Over the past year, Metsä have been very busy starting up green programmes as well as social sustainability campaigns. Here are a few:


1


Preventing Social Exclusion Metsä Tissue’s Serla brand is


participating in the charity campaign ‘Nuorten hyväksi’ (Let’s Help Young People) organised in Finland by the Tukikummit Foundation. Through the Foundation, Serla granted €100,000 to support underprivileged children and teens living in Finland. The funds will go towards improving their prospects and circumstances, and they hope promote further the discussion on the wellbeing of the young.


2


WWF Finland Metsä Group and WWF Finland


have been cooperating actively since 2011, with an aim to promote sustainable forestry. In 2012, they conducted the prescribed burning of retention tree groups forests in Metsä Group's forests in Rovaniemi, Finland. The burned areas were been monitored closely in 2013, and the points of interest include the spreading of fire-favoured species. Another project involved the preservation of endangered natural habitats as part of forestry in southern Finland, with guidelines


52 | FEATURE www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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