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Conference Calls


Last week, a whole host of chemical- industry big wigs descended upon the Hilton Deansgate, Manchester, for the 2014 Cleaning Products Europe conference. More than 120 cleaning professionals from 50 different companies within the marketplace, turned out to listen to the inspiring speakers and engaging presentations. The talks varied from where we are going as an industry, how to address and influence consumer behavioural changes, and of course to provide an understanding of the regulatory developments and initiatives which are impacting on the cleaning products market every day.


The annual conference acts as a platform for relevant cleaning companies to interact, to network, and to discuss those crucial topics being debated more and more frequently in today’s ever-growing market. Global sales of household cleaning products are predicted to reach $147billion in 2017, presenting numerous opportunities to companies who need to stay ahead of regulatory, environmental, societal, consumer and core industry developments and trends. The main sustainability focus led each speaker to start out their presentation by describing one major change they had made in their lives to make a difference, whether at home or at work. Ranging from cutting down


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on food waste, to less toilet flushes, the speakers certainly had some inventive answers, but all with the same ideals at heart.


Hayley Marsden, Senior Conference Producer working with Smithers Apex, commented: “There are a lot of common goals throughout the industry with respect to promoting sustainable lifestyles, and society should be involved to help develop solutions around innovations along the value chain. No one company can make it by themselves, so we need to look to developing collaboration models and work together towards these common goals.”


Counting On The Consumer Ilham Kadri, President of the Diversey Care Division for Sealed Air, detailed the trends, perspectives and forward-thinking actions which will help to address the consumer balance with regard to sustainability. Clearly very passionate about the industry, she focussed on how concepts of sustainability reach far further than simply cutting down wastage costs and improving cost- in-use figures. She commented: “The Earth is not ours; it is a treasure which we should hold dear for many future generations. It is inherited from your parents, and it belongs to your children, and that is the way we should look at it.”


She stressed to the audience of


Tomorrow’s Cleaning was invited along to the Cleaning Products Europe Conference 2014, so we thought we’d share with you the presentation highlights and the latest innovative ideas from the experts.


eager listeners how attention paid to sustainability is not new to Sealed Air. Ilham continued: “One of our founders of the TASKI machinery used to say that we have our customer’s interest in where we’re going, where they’re going and where the planet's going. That was back in 1920, so it’s in our DNA.”


Addressing the balance between company goals and objectives with consumer concerns has always been a debate, but Ilham highlighted how sustainability is not about a one- product show, but about integrating all our solutions into one form to receive optimum efficiency, with maximum sustainability. To do this, we need strong leadership, training and education, but continual innovation. She concluded: “I really believe that we are the last generation who have the possibility, or the luxury, to make a choice, and we need to make it today.”


Regulation Rationalisation Valerie Fotheringham, Chief Microbiologist at Evans Vanodine, provided an entirely different spin on the argument. Concentrating on the recent regulatory restrictions which have had a huge impact on chemicals used in today’s market, she said: “This conference has been really interesting for me, as it’s made me realise that there’s a lot of conflicting requirements on


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