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LONE WORKER PROTECTION


THE HIGH-VALUE, SECURE LONE


Klaus Allion, Managing Director at ANT Telecom, outlines how investing in a unified communication system that integrates lone workers can make your budget, and your


mobile workforce, go further and work harder. It’s a commonly held view that nothing works in isolation. But the estimated six million people in the UK classified as ‘lone workers’ may well disagree; they’re expected to do it every day. With a sizeable chunk of the UK workforce required to operate alone in remote geographies and high-risk environments, employees increasingly work in isolation. But, despite the obvious challenges of hazardous conditions, unsociable hours and often poor mobile coverage, some


organisations’ support for vulnerable lone workers remains sub-optimal.


Lone working has a particular resonance in manufacturing arenas such as energy, oil and gas, chemical plants and distilleries. In these disparate environments, employees are often required to work on-site at the isolated extremes of production plants, or off-site in the seclusion of the field. Yet whilst physically they may appear cut off from the rest of the world, companies cannot afford


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for lone workers to be disconnected from the rest of the workforce; they must be available any time, any place and anywhere.


Surprisingly, there is no specific legislation that governs lone working. The Health & Safety at Work Act makes basic provisions – the most pertinent being the need to provide equipment and procedures to control the risks of lone working. But in the main, companies’ processes to support mobile working do little to


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