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SLIPS, TRIPS & FALLS


CHOOSE WISELY


Flooring has developed and adapted in response to a growing need to answer specific safety concerns. Natalie Dowse, Marketing and Product Manager for Truvox International Ltd, identifies the cleaning


regimes which can help preserve safety. Health and safety has become an integral part of all our lives. Whether we’re at work or at play, a whole host of rules and regulations exist that are designed to protect us from risks and injury. It has arguably had the greatest impact on the workplace, and a wide range of safety products have been created to help employers and business owners comply.


There’s no doubt that flooring has changed considerably over recent years, adapting and developing in


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response to the needs of various activities. Safety is one of the main catalysts for these changes, with new surfaces, coatings and materials emerging to offer added benefits and reduce the risk of slips, trips and falls.


But installing the best safety flooring for your particular setting is only the first step – how you are going to clean and care for your floor in the years to come is just as important, if not more so. The correct cleaning and maintenance of flooring not only


prolongs its life – saving you time and money in the long run – it also helps to ensure that the flooring is performing at its best, and that those tasked with cleaning it, and others building users, are protected.


HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELFARE In its information sheet, Slips and Trips: The Importance of Floor Cleaning, the HSE stated that slips and trips are the most common cause of major injuries at work, costing


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