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all-state selection and Academic All- American in 2012. “It’s a blessing it was my right arm, because if it was my left, I probably wouldn’t be where I am. There aren’t as many dominant lefties, so I’m kind of unique.” But in the beginning, Emery’s parents


worried she would have a hard time doing ordinary, everyday tasks like fixing her hair and brushing her teeth. Emery’s mother, Tauny, said she did


everything she could to help, conducting arm exercises when she changed her diaper and praying constantly for healing. At age 1, Emery began bending her elbow and soon was picking up objects. “It was like God was giving me a little


light, ‘It’s going to be fine,’” Tauny Emery said. A little more than a year later,


Emery’s father, Danny, found a clinic specializing in brachial plexus injury at Houston Children’s Hospital. Emery underwent a


muscle transfer surgery to give her better outward motion and allow her to reach up to her head. Emery still does not


have any inward motion with her right arm (at least not without an assist from her left arm). But that has never stopped her from doing ordinary and sometimes extraordinary tasks. Even before she could walk, she found a way to get around by sitting and pushing herself with her left hand. Following that surgery, Emery continued physical therapy throughout her youth and tried swimming and gymnastics to help build strength in her arm and keep it moving. Then came team sports like soccer, softball, basketball and, in middle school, lacrosse. “I started processing that there was


a deficiency, but I never thought that I couldn’t do something,” Emery said. “My


58 LACROSSE MAGAZINE April 2014>>


A Publication of US Lacrosse


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