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Ask the Expert:


It’s Easy Being Green Q:


Natalie Dowse, Marketing and Product Manager for Truvox International Ltd, gives advice to organisations looking to implement more sustainable floor cleaning regimes.


‘Green’ fl oor cleaning is good for the health of


individuals, businesses and the environment, but how can I make sure this ethos goes into my regular cleaning practices?


years is no mere trend – it’s more of a movement. The vast majority of organisations, whether private or public sector, now aspire to limit the effects their activities have on the wider environment, and that means fi nding more sustainable ways to procure and provide services.


A:


The contract cleaning industry has evolved from simply cleaning for appearances to cleaning for health. By that, I mean the health of individuals, businesses and the wider environment; a holistic view of sustainable cleaning is the best approach to take, and any environmentally responsible cleaning regime should aim to:


• Conserve valuable resources, such as energy and water


• Reduce the use of harsh cleaning agents


• Improve environmental health and indoor air quality


• Increase health and safety outcomes for operatives and facility users


• Reduce noise • Use recyclable and reusable


60 | REGULAR


The increase in ‘green’ cleaning that we have seen in recent


machine components to keep waste to a minimum


Innovative technology is helping to develop fl oor cleaning machines that deliver these aims. For example, environmentally responsible vacuum cleaners must meet certain requirements regarding soil removal and dust containment. This is usually accomplished via fi ltration systems that trap dust and other contaminants, together with more advanced HEPA fi ltration systems which help to improve indoor air quality. Less dust reduces cleaning needs, helps to minimise maintenance costs, and reduces the number of airborne allergens, improving the health of building users.


Cylindrical brush technology is another way in which fl oor cleaning machines are evolving. Reducing the amount of water and chemicals needed to clean fl oors is a key ambition – what our US colleagues call ‘low moisture fl oorcare’. Independent tests conducted in America, have found that cylindrical brush technology can use as much as 30% less water than conventional rotary machines. This technology also has further possible sustainable benefi ts; it is claimed that cylindrical brushes last as long as 100 rotary machine pads, minimising waste and cutting down on consumables.


Companies looking to be more green and healthy when it comes to fl oorcare equipment should also consider looking for the following:


• Powered fl oor maintenance machines – including electric and battery- powered fl oor buffers and burnishers – that come with vacuum systems, guards and/ or other devices for capturing fi ne particulates


• Battery-powered equipment that uses environmentally preferable batteries


• Ergonomically designed equipment that minimises vibration and user fatigue


All things considered, green cleaning should perhaps be referred to as ‘cleaning for health’. By taking a more environmentally responsible attitude towards the procurement of your cleaning equipment, not only will the health of the environment, your building and employees improve, but your business’s bottom line should also increase, by saving on energy and consumables, and becoming more aware of the resources you use.


www.truvox.com


If you have a question for the expert, please email: caroline@opusbm.co.uk Your question could be featured in the next issue of Tomorrow's Cleaning.


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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