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What Would You


Recommend? Initial recommends that employers consider the following five factors to improve hygiene standards across the organisation in commercial environments:


1


Washrooms: Risk hotspots in the washroom include toilets,


fl ush handles and cubicle handles. Norovirus and bacteria such as Campylobacter can be found in these areas, both of which cause Gastroenteritis; the germs are transferred from surface to hand, but the spread of infection can be minimised with surface and fl ush sanitisers and toilet cleaners.


2 3


Reception: Door handles are a risk hotspot in reception and


entrance areas, harbouring bacteria which can be transferred from surface to hand and from hand to hand. It can cause skin infections, food poisoning and respiratory diseases, but the use of hand and surface sanitisers will kill germs and help prevent the spread of infection.


Corridors: High footfall makes corridors and common areas


germ hotspots. Scenting products will help control and minimise aromas that might be derived from malodour producing bacteria, while air disinfection units will help to reduce airborne micro-organisms.


4 5


Desks: Door handles and desk surfaces are risk hotspots in


meeting rooms, harbouring, for example, Rhinovirus, which is transferred from surface to hands and causes the common cold. Surface sanitisers can help minimise the spread of germs.


Kitchen areas: Food preparation surfaces in kitchens can be home


to pathenogenic strains of E.Coli and the Norovirus. It can be transmitted from surface to hand, hand to mouth or by infected food, and can cause Gastroenteritis and urinary tract infections. Good hand washing and drying products can help to minimise the risk of infection.


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