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How To Disinfect A Festival


One of the major problems with any festival is cleanliness. How to keep litter to a minimum, how to keep on top of hygiene standards, and how to prevent illness at such large gatherings of people are all areas which need consideration. Tomorrow’s Cleaning Editor, Caroline Canty, discusses how this may be possible.


When you think of a festival environment, good hygiene is not the first thing that comes to mind; visions of drunken people swaying to music while they’re knee-deep in mud puddles spring to the fore. But maintaining top hygiene standards is paramount to any organisation hosting such events; it’s a top priority, when so many people are


in constant close proximity to one another for long periods of time.


How can it be tackled? How can it be monitored? For many years, large cleaning companies have had to think about these questions and act swiftly whenever a problem occurs, but there are three key elements which they all go by.


Divide And Conquer The organisation of cleaning staff is crucial to any job, whether it’s an office block or a field full of lairy music-lovers. The key to handling any of the larger events, is to organise teams of cleaners which vary in size according to specific areas of cleaning importance. For example, the toilet cubicle areas will need constant supervision and maintenance, whereas the entrance will need very little attention for the majority of the event.


Daily team briefings are crucial to the way team cleaning works; the areas of importance will need to be reassessed every day as the focus of the event moves from one area to another, or with shorter festivals, large groups of people may leave early once the acts they came to see have performed, so you can be left with huge expanses of land which need to be cleaned before others. If you divide your team correctly, you will conquer areas far faster.


46 | EVENT CLEAN-UPS www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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