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Nviro Retain Associated British Ports Southampton Contract


Contract cleaning and FM specialist Nviro has successfully won the retender for the Associated British Ports Southampton (ABP Southampton) cleaning contract. The contract, worth over £200k per year, has been awarded for a further three years.


The port at Southampton is the largest cruise terminal in the UK, and houses a myriad of different buildings from office environments, freight terminals, distribution compounds, fruit terminals, security boxes, toilets and cruise ship terminals, which over 1.2 million passengers pass through every year.


Dating from the 11th century, the port is the 10th largest in the world, and now takes the form of an international dock with four large cruise ship terminals, some of which are a quarter of a mile in length. The port itself is spread across 294hectares with a reserve of nearly 324hectares for future expansion. Made famous by the Mayflower pilgrim vessel and the RMS Titanic, ABP Southampton is world-renowned, and this reputation relies heavily on the cleaning that takes place so that it can continue to function at its full potential.


The cleaning is undertaken by 22 permanent and eight casual cleaning operatives, a dedicated contract manager and a service manager. With such varied environments, the cleaning schedule is suited to fit each one individually, from the cleaning of


offices in normal working hours, to the cleaning of terminals which can be a seven-day operation at peak times when up to 60 ships can be docking during one month.


The success of the contract saw Nviro reach the finals of the Golden Service Awards last year within the “Best Cleaning Transport Terminal” category. Having retained the contract, Nviro will continue to provide this world-class service to ABP for a further three years.


www.nviro.co.uk WAMITAB Skills Survey Gives Workplace Snapshot


WAMITAB has released details of its first ever Skills Survey. Launched at the RWM exhibition in Autumn last year, the survey invited employers to contribute their feedback on the importance of training and workplace skills development, both at the exhibition and online.


The main results of the survey were:


• 81% of respondents stated that green issues are very important to their business.


• 76% of respondents had invested in training in the last 12 months.


• 72% of respondents planned to invest in training in the next six months.


12 | NEWSFLASH


• The most popular forms of training were short courses and technical qualifications.


• The greatest motivators to invest in training were to develop staff and address the skills gap.


• Cost and lack of time were identified as the biggest barriers to investment in training.


Mark Hyde, Commercial Director for WAMITAB, said: “We are greatly encouraged by the response to the WAMITAB Skills Survey. The importance companies place on qualifications and training was highlighted by the fact that the majority of participants revealed that their organisations had


invested in this in the past year, and intended to do more in 2014.


“Respondents also told us that they preferred a combination of training styles including classroom- based, distance and online learning. Flexible options are important to organisations and their staff, as it breaks down barriers to learning, making the improvement of skills accessible and achievable for all.


“This feedback will help WAMITAB and its partners to continue developing relevant qualifications and training programmes that deliver the results that employers and their employees want.”


www.wamitab.org.uk www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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