This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
2


the


Kilowatt F FEBRUARY 2014 INSIDE YOUR CO-OP


A Touchstone Energy Cooperative


Kiwash Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Providing the service


that lights up your life.


Office Location PO Box 100


120 W. 1st Street


Cordell, Oklahoma (888) 832-3362


www.kiwash.coop


Find us on Facebook Staff


Dennis Krueger manager


Wendy Putman director of finance


Lisa Willard director of


communications Roy Dewees


director of operations


Board of Trustees officers


Jack Sawatzky president


Robert Travis vice president


John Schaufele


sec.-treasurer Rex Eagan


asst. sec.-treasurer directors


Virginia Walker


Ralph Cunningham Jevon West


FIGHT BACK


• Report damaged meters or electrical equipment to the county sheriff immediately.


• If you notice suspicious vehicles or activity along electric lines or near substations, call 911.


Copper Crime Is On The Rise Thieves steal meter loops from private property in rural areas


and Washita County Sheriff Roger Reeves in December regarding our local problem:


T


“We are experiencing copper theft in a new and unusual way. The thieves are hooking up to the meter-loop with mast on the poles and pulling them down with a truck. They are probably selling the copper and aluminum wire inside these meter loops. The replacement value is around $600+ per meter loop, and they are owned by the property owners and not Kiwash Electric. So far, thieves are targeting meter loops that are not in service and located in remote fields.


The thefts are happening in both Custer and Washita counties. To date, three have been reported to us. As farmers and ranchers request power service to operate


he following is an excerpt from the letter we mailed to Custer County Sheriff Bruce Peoples


cattle water wells or fence chargers, the number of stolen meter loops may soon rise.


Kiwash Electric is alerting you on this matter because I’m sure some of these landowners will file a report for insurance purposes. More importantly, your officers might want to visit scrap metal dealers and make sure short pieces of copper and aluminum are not being purchased or sold without knowing their origins. A typical rural meter loop is 10 to 18 feet in length with three to four insulated wires, mostly #4 or 2/0 wire, inside either a 1½ to 2 inch unusually threaded steel pipe conduit of similar length.


This is strictly an alert from Kiwash Electric Cooperative for consideration by your departments. While it is difficult to catch copper thieves in action, a visit to the scrap yards might be the key to stopping these thieves.”


If you notice missing meter loops on your property or anywhere in your area, I encourage you to report it to the county sheriff’s office immediately so they can begin to understand this rising problem. The number of thefts has definitely increased since this December letter was written.


Kiwash members should also report anyone selling used breaker boxes, steel conduit or copper and aluminum wire in short pieces. You may be aware of someone burning insulation off of wire; if so, please contact the local sheriff’s office immediately.


Meter loops with masts are the property of the individual homeowner. That means you pay for it if is stolen. Don't let copper thieves dip into your pocket: Now is the time to step forward and bring all pertinent information to the attention of your county sheriff. By working together, we can stop these thieves!


By Dennis Krueger general manager


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160