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Lower Energy Costs For Kiamichi Members


for co-op members while reducing KEC's systemwide power demand. "It's a win-win for everyone," said Jim Jackson, Kiamichi Electric CEO.


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KEC's new geothermal program reduces installation costs for qualifying members by eliminating the expense of installing the in-ground loops. Instead, KEC installs and maintains the loops with the member paying a small monthly fee.


When coupled with the co-op's existing rebate program—which pays up to $650 per ton on qualifying geothermal units— the cost for a ground source heat pump becomes much more affordable. To further sweeten the deal, homeowners who install geothermal heat pumps can also qualify for a tax credit from the federal government.


To participate, members must own the property where the unit will be located. For details, contact Todd Minshall at 800-888-2731.


KEC's new partnership with Energy Pioneer Solutions (EPS) broadens the savings options for members by providing up to $6,000 in financing for a variety of home improvements such as storm windows and doors, energy efficient appliances, insulation and more. Improvements are based on a thorough inspection of the home by trained energy specialists.


When the assessment is complete, the homeowner will receive a unique package of solutions to save energy based on the home's structure and family usage patterns.


Kiamichi Electric members who qualify are able to include payment for the energy upgrades they wish to finance on their monthly electric bill. This will make it easier for the member to make a single payment and save energy and money at the same time.


To take advantage of these services, call EPS at 855-937-9484, or visit energypioneersolutions.com.


4 | january-february 2014 | Light Post


wo new programs from Kiamichi Electric Cooperative (KEC) aim to lower energy costs


Cold Enough For You? What NOT to do when it's cold outside


Don’t light up your wood-burning fireplace. A crackling fire doesn’t contribute much heat to your room. Plus, the open flue sucks the heated air out of your house through the chimney. Burning a fire in the hearth when the temperature dips into the 20s can actually increase your heating bills.


Don’t overstuff your refrigerator. Stacking holiday leftovers on top of each other and squeezing extra containers of food onto every refrigerator shelf prevents the air from circulating around them. This forces the appliance’s compressor to work harder and use more electricity.


Don’t crank the thermostat way up to heat a cold house in a hurry. Turning the heat up to 90 degrees won’t warm up a 70-degree house any quicker than turning it up to 73 degrees, and if you forget to turn the thermostat back down before your house overheats, that’s a waste of energy.


Don’t run bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans any longer than you have to. Flip them on to clear smoke or steam. Once the air clears, turn them off. They pull heated air from your home, which can cause your heater to run longer than necessary.


Don’t use a barbecue grill or a propane patio heater indoors. Even if your central heating system is on the fritz, this is a fire hazard and can expose your family to carbon monoxide poisoning.


Don’t leave a space heater running when you leave the house. Even if the room will be cold when you return, shut off portable heaters if you’re not going to be there to see them topple over, overheat or catch something on fire.


Don’t turn off your ceiling fans. Ceiling fans save energy during the summer and winter. The trick: Reverse the direction that the blades spin. Heat rises, so in the winter, the blades should blow warm air down into the room.


Don’t close the blinds. No matter how cold it is outside, let the sun shine into your room to warm it up and give your heating system a break. Close blinds and curtains after dark.


Don’t close off unused rooms. When you do, you restrict the flow of air that helps your heating system warm your home evenly. Cutting off that air flow makes your heater run longer and work harder to maintain a comfortable temperature in the rest of the house.


Don’t turn your furnace completely off, even if you’re going on an extended winter vacation. Set the thermostat to 55°F. so the plumbing pipes in an unheated house won’t freeze and burst.


For more ways to save energy this winter, please visit www.kiamichielectric.org or togetherwesave.com.


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