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DO NOT PLACE DEER STANDS NEAR ELECTRIC LINES!


As part of the FEMA work of replacing power lines and poles, Harmon Electric is cleaning our rights-of- way. During this process, Harmon Electric crews have found several deer stands placed too close to overhead electric lines. Some deer stands have even been found attached to Harmon Electric poles.


illegal, but life threatening to our members and line- workers.


This is not only


Not only do these attachments put line crews at risk, anyone illegally placing these items on poles comes dangerously close to energized power lines with thousands of volts of energy pulsing overhead. It’s always wise to keep any structure at least 15 feet away from utility poles. One deer stand removed for safety reasons from our service territory was so close to overhead lines, any hunter in the stand could have reached out and come into contact with the line. Let me emphazize that this is LIFE THREATENING! You or your child could come into contact with the lines and be killed instantly. 116901 It may seem innocent, but even a small nail partially driven into a pole can have deadly results around high-


New Bulb on the Block: Meet LED Lucy


There’s a new lighting mascot in town. CFL Charlie, a cartoon mascot


Cooperatives®, the brand “ID” of the nation’s not-for-profit, consumer- owned electric cooperatives, helps families become “Super Savers” by switching to energy efficient lightbulbs. In 2013 he was joined by LED Lucy, a dazzling, spunky mascot lighting the way for even brighter bulb savings. Lighting standards started shifting


away from traditional lightbulbs in 2012. CFL Charlie and LED Lucy want to make sure Harmon Electric members know about all lighting options.


Lucy confides. The mascot’s light- emitting diodes beam. “The first LED was created in 1927. Since


“I’m older than I look,” LED for Touchstone Energy


then we’ve added stylish colors, and costs have dropped. I love bargains, and LED prices get lower every year!”


The mascots share a few pointers on their energy efficiency namesakes.


Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs):


CFL Charlie-and other bulbs like him-are the most common and economical efficient lightbulbs on the market. The swirly style is linked to the concept of efficient lighting,


haven’t warmed up to the design. “Not everyone likes to see my


but some consumers


voltage electricity. Your local electric co-op line crews work on utility poles at all hours of the day and night, in the worst of conditions. Anything attached to utility poles can create serious hazards for our line personnel. Sharp objects like nails, tacks, staples, or barbed wire can puncture rubber gloves and other safety equipment, making linemen vulnerable to electrocution. Unauthorized pole attachments violate the National Electrical Safety Code, the accepted manual containing guidelines for safe electrical engineering standards. Utilities strictly follow this code that includes a section that reads, “Signs, posters, notices, and other attachments shall not be placed on supporting structures without concurrence of the owner (the utility is the owner of the pole). Supporting structures should be kept free from other climbing hazards such as tacks, nails, vines, and through bolts not properly trimmed.” Our primary concern remains to be the safety of our workers and members. Power lines are a constant part of our landscape; it’s easy to forget they are around. We work hard to keep the area around our lines clear, but we need your help.


Please help us keep our linemen-and our community- safe. Don’t attach any of these unauthorized and dangerous items to utility poles and keep them at least 15 feet away from overhead lines. Fixtures not belonging to the cooperative or another utility will be removed by co-op line personnel; the co-op is not responsible for any losses if an item is damaged or destroyed during removal.


swirls,” explains Charlie. “That’s fine by me-everyone has a different sense of style. Several of my friends are designed to look just like a traditional lightbulb.” CFLs offer 75 percent energy sav- ings over traditional incandescent bulbs and pay for themselves in 9 months, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.


Light emitting diodes (LEDs): LEDs have been used for years


By banding several small diodes together, a bright and dependable light emerges. “It’s going to be fun to watch LED Lucy gain fans,” laughs Charlie. “She uses a little less energy than me, and lasts 25 times longer than traditional incandescent bulbs.” Since lighting adds up to 10 percent of a home’s electric bill, every bulb counts. To help children learn more about lighting, visit www.kidsenergyzone.com.


the size of a pencil


in cell phones and other electronics. Most diodes are half


small—about eraser.


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