This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PAGE 2 | FEBRUARY 2014


Crying ‘fowl’ when the power goes out BY JULIANN GRAHAM, Communications Coordinator


F


lipping a switch to turn on the lights is pretty simple. Making sure power flows to that light


is not. Members count on TCEC to deliver safe, reliable and affordable power. When power doesn’t flow to the switch, it’s frustrating for the member and for TCEC alike.


Birds and other wildlife like snakes or squirrels caused seven percent of the total outages at TCEC in 2013. Across the nation, animals caused 11 percent of outages. Te four percent difference indicates measures the cooperative takes to minimize outages are working.


“We’d expect our number of animal- related outages to be lower here because we have a different type of wildlife,” Lyle Mathis, Maintenance manager, said. “We also take several steps to help prevent animal-related outages.”


To avoid outages and protect birds, TCEC installs several types of wildlife covers that provide protection for birds. Crews install bushing covers, arrestor covers, cutout covers and center phase raptor protectors. Tese serve to protect the wildlife from electrocution and to protect the system from outages.


JOURNEYMAN LJ OGDEN, A MEMBER OF THE MAINTENANCE CREW, INSTALLS A CENTER PHASE RAPTOR PROTECTOR ON A LINE NEAR HOOKER. TCEC INSTALLS SEVERAL TYPES OF WILDLIFE PROTECTION.


Te cooperative constantly reviews its construction standards to identify ways to improve. Mathis said the cooperative is looking at designing its power lines with more clearance and possibly different materials to avoid outages.


Snakes in substations have been a problem in the past. Tey are attracted to substations because birds like to nest there. During monthly substation inspections, crews look for nests and remove them. Tey also maintain the vegetation around the substation to help keep snakes and other wildlife away.


While it may be possible for TCEC to do more to prevent animal-related outages, it’s not feasible to do so. Te cooperative works hard to keep costs low. When considering wildlife protection options, Mathis measures costs against benefits. Te goal is to find solutions that deliver significant results for a minimal investment overall.


“We’re always looking at ways to prevent outages, regardless of the possible cause,” Mathis said. “It’s too costly to prevent 100 percent of outages. Our goal is to keep them to a minimum.”n


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160