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It takes about 50 traditional incandescent bulbs, or eight to 10 CFLs, to last as long as one LED lamp.


Measuring LED potential Te Arlington, Va.-based


Cooperative Research Network has partnered with several electric cooperatives throughout the United States to test LEDs. Researchers are cautiously optimistic; LEDs offer several benefits:


 LEDs could last longer, perhaps even for decades


 Te energy to use LEDs could be substantially less than that of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other fluorescents


 With no mercury content, LEDs are more environmentally- friendly


 Te products are rugged and more resistant to breakage


 LEDs perform well in cold climates, especially outdoors


 LEDs can be dimmed and produce a more pleasing light


Some consumers avoid LEDs


because the price tag exceeds normal lightbulb costs. Te true value lies in the lifetime of the bulb. It takes about 50 traditional incandescent bulbs, or eight to 10 CFLs, to last as long as one LED lamp.


Buyer Beware


Poor quality LED products are flooding the marketplace. Some are manufactured outside of the United States with components that produce low light levels, don’t boast a long service life, or make exaggerated energy-saving claims. Don’t be fooled. Look for the U.S. Department of Energy’s ENERGY STAR logo for guaranteed color quality over time, steady light output over the lamp's lifetime, high efficiency, and a warranty. You can also look for an LED


Lighting Facts label. Te label helps consumers compare products to manufacturer claims and similar products with a quick summary of performance in five areas:


 Lumens: Measures light output. Te higher the number, the more light is emitted.


 Lumens per watt (lm/W): Measures efficiency. Te higher the number, the more efficient the product.


 Watts: Measures the energy required to light the product. Te lower the wattage, the less energy is used.


 Color Rendering Index (CRI): Measures the effect of the lamp’s light spectrum on the color appearance of objects. Te higher the number, the truer the appearance of the light. Incandescent lighting is 100 on the CRI.


are coming. Congress mandates lightbulbs become 70 percent more efficient by 2020. Curious if LEDs are right for


 Correlated Color Temperature (CCT): Measures light color.


you? Learn more using LED labels at www.lightingfacts.com/content/ consumers. Homeowners can visit www.energysavers.gov/lighting to compare LEDs to new energy- efficient incandescent bulbs and CFLs.


Sources: NRECA, Te Association of Electrical Equipment and Medical Imaging Manufacturers, U.S. Department of Energy, Cooperative Research Network. News Magazine 15


“Cool” colors have higher Kelvin temperatures (3,,600–5,500 K); “warm” colors have lower color temperatures (2,700–3,000 K). Cool white light is usually better for visual tasks. Warm white light is usually better for living spaces because it casts a warmer light on skin and clothing. Color temperatures of 2,700 to 3,600 K are recommended for most general indoor and task lighting.


Shedding Light on LEDs More lighting efficiency changes


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