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Energy Efficiency A new year calls for updated


lightbulb efficiency guidelines. No need to use bulbs with a twist; light- emitting diodes (LEDs) can help you switch on savings. Congress called for improved


energy efficiency standards for traditional incandescent bulbs under the federal Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. By 2014, lightbulbs using between 40W to 100W must consume at least 28 percent less energy than classic bulbs. Te change will save Americans an estimated $6 billion to $10 billion in lighting costs annually.


When the next wave of standards


kicks in next month, traditional 40W and 60W incandescents will no longer be available. In their place, some consumers are filling the gap with a solid solution: LEDs.


‘Solid’ lighting


Incandescent bulbs create light using a thin wire (filament) inside a glass bulb—a delicate connection that can easily be broken, as frustrated homeowners can attest. In contrast, LEDs are at the forefront of solid-state lighting—small, packed electronic chip devices. Two conductive materials are


LEDs: A Decade of Change


By 2014, lightbulbs using between 40W to 100W must consume at least 28 percent less energy than traditional incandescents, saving Americans an estimated $6 billion to $10 billion in lighting costs annually. The federal Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 also mandates that lightbulbs become 70 percent more efficient by 2020. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are quickly evolving to meet this challenge. Learn more: EnergySavers.gov/Lighting


40W-equivalent and 60W-equivalent LED lightbulbs reach the market


Production stops for 100W incandescent lightbulbs


75W-equivalent LED lightbulbs projected to reach the market


75W incandescent lightbulbs will no longer be available


100W-equivalent LED lightbulbs projected to reach the market


Production of 40W and 60W incandescent lightbulbs ends


All lightbulbs emit at least 45 lumens per watt


2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Source: U.S. Department of Energy Lighting Facts Product Snapshot: LED Replacement Lamps 2011


14 January 2014


Megan McKoy-Noe and Brian Sloboda


Solid Lighting Solutions LEDs meet (and exceed) 2014 lighting efficiency standards


placed together on a chip (a diode). Electricity passes through the diode, releasing energy in the form of light. Invented in 1960 by General


Electric, the first LEDs were red— the color depends on materials placed on the diode. Yellow, green, and orange LEDs were created in the 1970s and the recipe for the color blue—the foundation for white LEDs—was unlocked in the mid- 1990s. Originally used in remote controls, exit signs, digital watches, alarm clocks, and car signal lights, LEDs quickly gained momentum for large-scale lighting.


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