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February 2014


NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.


Seal manufactured home air leaks to slash electric bills


I


f energy bills for your manufac- tured home seem too high, the likely culprits are air leaks. Here are some tips from Northwestern Elec- tric that can help you stop leaks from your home—and your wallet. Older manufactured homes, espe- cially those built before 1994, may be plagued by leaking ducts and inade- quate insulation. Leaky duct work can reduce the efficiency of your heating and cooling system by as much as 20 percent. A good time to check for leaks is on a windy day, when you’ll be able to find drafty spots. Experts recommend going after big leaks first. That means plugging all holes around chimneys, vents, water pipes, and heating system duct work. Seal any duct leaks with mastic. Avoid the use of duct tape, which can dry out and disintegrate when used. Adding insulation to floor, walls, and ceiling cavities can improve energy ef-


Hidden account number contest


Congratulations to Carlene


Krueger for recognizing her ac- count number in last month’s news- letter. The other number belonged to J. C. Beauchamp.


For those of you who aren’t familiar with the contest, this is how it works. We have hidden two account numbers somewhere in the articles in this newsletter. The numbers will always be enclosed in parentheses and will look similar to this example (XXXXXX).


If you recognize your account


number, all you have to do is give us a call on or before the 8th of the current month and we’ll give you a credit on your bill for the amount stated.


This month’s numbers are worth $25 each. Happy hunting!


1 (16 ounce) package Oreo cookies 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened 1 (24 ounce) package white almond bark 1 (24 ounce) package chocolate bark, optional


Crush Oreos with a blender until powder like. Using the blender or hand mixer, mix Oreos and cream cheese together. Roll into walnut size balls and chill for one hour.


Melt approximately 3/4 package of white almond bark. Stick a tooth- pick in an Oreo ball and dip it in the melted white almond bark. Allow to harden on wax paper for about 15 minutes.


Optional - When Oreo balls are no longer sticky to the touch, decorate with drizzles of melted chocolate and white almond bark to give them a festive look. Use a sandwich bag with a tiny hole cut in one corner to drizzle the melted chocolate.


Store in an air tight container in the refrigerator. Yield: 25-35 walnut sized treats.


ficiency, but may be a job for a professional contractor. Once you’ve sealed ma- jor leaks, look for smaller ones—around windows, doors, electrical outlets, and light switches. Seal gaps around windows and doors, using caulk on non-moving parts. And replace any worn weather stripping.


Caulk or expanding spray foam are perfect in spots where plumbing, wiring, vents and ducting penetrate through walls. Installing foam outlet gaskets behind electrical outlets and light switches—especially on out- side walls—can save energy, too. For safety’s sake, make sure that all combustion appliances, such as furnaces, stoves, and water heaters, are properly vented.


Sealing air leaks in manufactured homes can help lower utility costs. Installing foam outlet gaskets behind electrical outlets and light switches is just one way to help save energy.


ergy—and money—visit Touchstone Energy®


For other tips on how to save en- Cooperatives energy-saving


website, www.TogetherWeSave.com.


Cream Cheese Oreo Balls


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