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Dining in the Dark ■ Food Safety Tips During a Power Outage


Storm-induced power outages can take you by surprise. If you’ve lost power and have a refrigerator full of food, make sure time and temperatures are on your side. If your home’s power is interrupt- ed for two hours or less, losing perish- able foods shouldn’t be a concern. When an outage is prolonged, it’s time to decide when to save and when to toss food away. A digital quick-response ther- mometer can be one of the most useful


tools you can wield in your battle to preserve food. The gadget checks the internal temperature of food, ensuring items are cold enough to eat safely. Use these food safety tips to help you minimize food loss and reduce the risk of food borne illness:


Refrigerated Food


• Keep refrigerator doors closed as much as possible. An unopened refrigerator keeps food cold for about four hours.


• If food (especially meat, poul-


Scholarships Available to Area High School Seniors


Each year NFEC awards $500 scholarships to six students who are graduating from area high schools. The selection committee reviews numerous applications search- ing for those students who have high academic standards, and who are also involved in school activities and their communities.


“Education is freedom, and we take seriously our role in supporting our students. We are proud to help these outstanding young people continue their education,” says NFEC General Manager Scott Copeland.


Seniors interested in ap- plying for the scholarships are encouraged to contact Kenny Waugh, NFEC youth programs coordinator, at (580) 928-3366, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Applications are due no later than April 1.


try, fish, eggs, and leftovers) has been exposed to temperatures above 40 degrees Fahrenheit for two or more hours, or has an unusual odor, texture, or color, get rid of it. Remember the American Red Cross food safety rule: “When in doubt, throw it out.” • Never taste food to determine its safety or rely on appearance or odor. • Use perishable foods first, then


frozen food. • To keep perishable food cold, place them in a refrigerator or cooler and cover with ice.


Frozen Food • A full freezer stays colder longer. Freeze containers of water to help keep food cold in the freezer. If your water supply runs out, melting ice can supply drinking water.


• If you keep the door closed, a full freezer keeps the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full).


• If food in the freezer is colder than 40 degrees Fahrenheit, is partially thawed, and has ice crystals on it, you can safely refreeze it. • Always discard frozen or perish- able food items that have come into contact with raw meat juices. Find more tips at www.Food-


Safety.gov. Hidden


Account Number If you see your account


number in this newsletter, call our office, identify yourself and the number. We will credit your electric bill $25. The number may be located anywhere in the newsletter and is chosen at random. If you don’t know your account


number, call our office or look on your bill. To get the credit, you must call before the next month’s newsletter is mailed.


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