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here is something extremely beautiful about crystal clear water lit by twinkling lights, the water


ripples creating a visual masterpiece with the light playing across the water. Most underwater lighting installations use fibre optics as this allows for the electricity source to be positioned safely away from the water. The other advantage is that due to the clever way fibre optics work, there is never the need to carry out maintenance work at the light source, thus eliminating the need to drain down the pool, fountain or other vestibule. Fibre Optics are also extremely energy


efficient as only one metal halide lamp can power many light outputs. When specifying fibre optic lighting that will be submersed the main issue is the quality of the materials installed. Glass fibre should be high quality and fixtures should be stainless steel so that there is no chance of decay and corrosion. Underwater lighting in wet rooms, pools


or domestic bathrooms can be designed to create many differing moods and effects. Colour temperature and beam control can change the mood of a room from soft and mellow to very dramatic. Absolute Action has over 30 years experience in the design, manufacture, installation and commission of fine fibre optics and a vast understanding of the effects lighting can have on water. “Light and water attain their most


effective combination when the beams are most intensely focused in reflection –


whether off the water itself or structural surfaces – or where the water is disturbed by animation. The fascination of aquatic motion, whether in sinuous or agitated liveliness, is always enhanced by the presence of light as it breaks in refraction and adds a third dimension” commented Emma Dawson-Tarr, Managing Director of Absolute Action Limited. As the light source of a fibre optic is


electric and heat free, the light heads are safe to touch and walk over so can be used literally wherever the design dictates. Lighting can be installed in most areas from spot lights on the floor of a wet room to illuminating a showerhead so that every single drop of water is lit. Absolute Action doesn’t only work on commercial projects they also work on private residences. They completed work on a private pool creating differing atmospheres with a simple control point. Six different colour changes were used for regulating the time and mood. The uplighters for the wall art and the downlighters in the pool can both be lit separately or in unison. All underwater lighting was powered by only two 350w metal halide lightsources (Spectralux 8000) and the back wall lit by just one 150w metal halide lightsource (Spectralux 600), showing just how simple such a beautiful display can be. Universal Fibre Optics specialises in


fibre optic lighting and has completed a number of projects utilising underwater lighting in both commercial and residential


properties. Fibre optics can offer another dimension with colour changing light. Universal Fibre Optics offer a range of end fittings specially designed for use underwater and side glow fibre can give a distinctive line of light which looks wonderful at night. Pennyhill Park Hotel and Spa commissioned Universal Fibre Optics to light two pools to create a soft glow of light in the water. The submersible eyeball fitting was used around the pools and on the steps to create an alluring glow; this was complemented with functional lighting for anyone using the pool in the evening. Large diameter glass fibre and metal halide sources were used in conjunction with UFO E1 fittings. Underwater lighting can be used in


many different applications but always brings a touch of glamour and affluence to any space. It is cost effective to run as it is energy efficient and can create the most beautiful of atmospheres blending with the tranquility of water.


Contact


Absolute Action +44 (0) 1622 351000 www.absolute-action.com


Universal Fibre Optics +44 (0)1890 883 416 www.universal-fibre-optics.com


www.a1lightingmagazine.com


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