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Main image: Solvents With Safety warehouse, lighting by MHA. Far left: Before and after shot of Solvents With Safety warehouse, after lighting by MHA.


same high quality spectrally balanced light, smooth dimming, intuitive user interface and stand alone operation that the entire ETC fixture line is known for. It is available in portable, ceiling mounted and track mounted versions. When lighting an entire building or office, ETC offers Unison Paradigm, which can be installed with daylight harvesting features. Occupancy or vacancy sensors can also be included along with timers for automatically dimming or switching light on or off as required. According to Harvard Engineering over 75% of controllable lighting sold in Europe today is not being controlled. Control technologies offer huge potential for significant energy savings and this is an area that many businesses and organisations could utilise. EyeNut from Harvard Engineering is a fantastic new lighting control solution for indoor applications. The solution can be completely customisable to the needs of the user, who can control and monitor the lighting output from one single hub. The system works for both single and multiple sites. The system is wireless so can be easily installed in new buildings or into existing premises without the need for expensive and disruptive rewiring. With it being estimated that of all the buildings that will exist in the UK in 2050, 80% of them are already here, this is a significant benefit and could cut a significant amount of energy. This is a great tool for those wishing to reduce the amount of energy used; it is an ideal monitoring and control system for indoor applications. Keenlight offer a range of energy efficient fixtures for both Retail and Commercial spaces. Paul Rowe from Keenlight comments, “During the past 20 years lamp and control gear technology has been greatly improved by the ‘Major’ manufacturers. The increase in efficiency from Magnetic Ballasts to high frequency ballasts together with lamp improvements from T12 to T8 to T5 types. It must be remembered that it is not only improved lamp and gear technology that improves efficiency it is the choice of high efficiency reflector material and plastics.”


Three fittings in particular have been developed for use with current LED spot and strip modules. These give improved efficiency over the latest fluorescent modules of 25% and 48% for the same achieved lumination levels. The 600mm x 600mm direct indirect fitting is useful where LG7 requirement are needed. The Asymmetric 600mm x 300mm is used to illuminate wall mounted merchandise and saves 48 per cent. To replace CDM-T and TC recessed and track mounted fittings, the new 3000 lumen LED unit provides as much light as a 35W CDM fitting. All units having a 50,000 hour rated life instead of 15,000 to 20,000 hours from conventional fittings. MHA Lighting recently completed a project at Solvents with Safety. While the warehouse was undergoing a site re-build, the firm found that lighting had been incorrectly specified and needed replacing. The old lighting system offered ineffectual lighting levels and proved to be expensive to run. With the use of the right products and some careful planning MHA were able to triple the light levels in the warehouse while also reducing the lighting energy consumption. The newly installed system saved over £20,000 on lighting energy bills and 60 tonnes of Co2, this was all done by simply replacing the existing Halide fittings with award-winning LED Lighting. The refit consisted of 18 fittings from MHA’S CLite range, with six sensors installed,


Top Image: Selador Desire D22 by ETC. Above: EyeNut lighting control system by Harvard Engineering.


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