This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Eyes On...


Eyes On...


LED Engin is one of the brightest stars emerging in emitter and optic technology. We quiz Gerrit-Willem Prins (pictured left) of LED Engin Europe about the company’s progress.


What was the inspiration behind LED Engin and how did you overcome the challenges of the global economic downturn?


LED Engin was founded in 2004 by Xiantao Yan, who currently serves as the company’s Chief Technology Officer. Dr. Yan served as a rocket engineer in China and gained expertise in thermal design, opto-electronics and photonics packaging solutions before leading a group of researchers at LED Engin in the development of ultra high power, compact LEDs emitters.


LED Engin was far less exposed to the fallout of the recent global downturn than other companies. Although falling prices put a squeeze on margins in the general lighting market, LED Engin operates in markets such as architectural lighting, stage and studio lighting and UV curing that have continued to flourish. Companies seeking to retain competitiveness by choosing to fund new product


development rather than cut R&D have also boosted LED Engin.


What differentiates your products from your competitors?


LED Engin uses a patented multi-layer, ceramic substrate design that, in combination with a proprietary die attachment process, results in very low 50 C/W*mm2 values, in some cases up to 80% lower than typical industry alternatives. The substrate’s coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is closely matched to that of the LED die, eliminating stress as its temperature rises when driven at high drive currents, further enhancing reliability.


This improvement in the way that heat is transferred away from the die means the LED can be driven at higher electrical current without exceeding its maximum allowable junction temperature. As a result, very compact emitters can create high luminous flux density without adversely affecting the life of the LED emitter.


Due to the emitter’s compact design, the optical efficiency of a secondary lens is maximised and exploits total internal reflection to focus the beam angle more tightly than previously achievable. An etendue-minimised, flat-top option allows efficient use of zoom lenses when this type of emitter is used. In both cases, emitters facilitate the design of fixtures capable of


delivering exceptionally high lux-on-target over considerable distances. Furthermore, LED fixtures that use compact emitters can be made smaller, sometimes by an order of magnitude compared with earlier types, making the fixture less intrusive at a given venue.


Importantly, we also offer the flexibility to develop unique solutions to enable customers to differentiate products. So if a customer wants to make reds (R9) look richer and skin tones (R13) look natural or simply demands a custom colour combination in LuxiGen’s tunable multi channel packages, LED Engin can help.


Why are your products specified in so many innovative entertainment fixtures? Designers of entertainment lighting schemes face unique challenges in coming up with original creative ideas for every occasion. They need the widest possible choice of colours, beam widths and lumen intensity from lighting fixtures, plus flexible control technology to best express their creative ideas.


LEDs are becoming increasingly popular as alternatives to inefficient conventional tungsten lighting and costly short-arc metal


38


www.a1lightingmagazine.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84