This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ENTRANCE MATTING MAKING A GOOD ENTRANCE


“ “


44


This issue, we asked four experts from the UK’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of entrance matting the question: ‘What makes a good entrance?’ Read on to find out what Chris Stanley of COBA, Janet Lowe of Forbo, architectural journalist Gideon Sykes and Alison Kitchingman of Milliken, had to say.


“Obviously, a good entrance should be both smart and practical. Entrance matting should do what is intended of it; to scrape and wipe dirt and moisture and prevent it tracking into the building. It’s important that the right matting is used for optimum performance and durability, so volumes of footfall should be ascertained when specifying for any building. Effective entrance matting should also help reduce slipping on


“Entrance matting plays an integral role in any operation to keep interiors clean and tidy. For an entrance matting system to work effectively, it has to do several things – remove moisture, grit, dirt, mud or snow, and retain this detritus so that it is not transferred inside to soil the foyer. Furthermore, it must have the ability to clean different kinds of footwear and facilitate cleaning


hard floor surfaces. There should be no risk of trip hazards and access should not be inhibited, so matting should fit flush into a matwell, or if laid to surface, have bevelled edging which allows wheeled access. Ease of cleaning and maintenance is also important if the matting is to function effectively and retain its appearance.”


and/or removal of the residual dirt all while looking pristine. That’s why top manufacturers, such as Plastic Extruders Ltd, have spent the last 50 years extensively developing and testing to create some of the world’s best entrance mattings.”


GIDEON SYKES ARCHITECTURAL JOURNALIST


“The entrance to a building is one of the most important areas, where first impressions count and safety must be at its utmost. Having an effective entrance system that is visually appealing, but can also remove walked in dirt and moisture from footwear and wheeled traffic, is essential. Installing up to 6m of Forbo’s new range of Coral entrance systems, for example, will effectively protect the


“Six key points to consider when identifying entryway systems for your facility are:


Functionality: Each entryway needs to be assessed individually to identify the best solution. Safety: A safe entryway system can prevent unnecessary injuries. Aesthetics: Designers should discuss entryway systems at the onset of a project to incorporate aesthetics, functionality and safety. Durability: Careful consideration should be given


to the three elements that separate all of the entryway products: raw materials, product construction and engineering. Serviceability: Consideration should also be given to the required maintenance and cleaning cycles. Price: Price is important, but the life cycle and total cost of ownership should also be taken into consideration.”


ALISON KITCHINGMAN DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND DESIGN, MILLIKEN


“ “


CHRIS STANLEY SALES DIRECTOR, COBA EUROPE LTD


interior floor coverings and finishes by removing a massive 94% of walked in dirt and moisture from the soles of shoes. This in turn will help to reduce cleaning bills by up to 65%, protect the interior floors and reduce the potential for slips.”


JANET LOWE UK MARKETING MANAGER, FORBO FLOORING SYSTEMS


www.tomorrowsfl ooring.com


“ “


“ “


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74