This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
MAKEOVER OF THE MONTH


MARSEILLE'S MUSEUM MAKEOVER


For this issue's Makeover of the Month feature, we take a look at American Hardwood’s installation of heat-treated American ash on the rooftop of a brand new Marseille Museum.


The flagship project of Marseille's on-going architectural and cultural renaissance, the Museum of European and Mediterranean Civillisations, features a stunning rooftop area that will surely impress visitors from all over the world for many years to come.


The museum itself is organised over three levels, with an array of exhibitions, an auditorium and a bookstore, but it’s the impressive rooftop with panoramic views over the sea and harbour that may well draw the crowds in initially.


The decking spans a width of 24m, covers an area of 1,600m2


, and handles


a constant flow of pedestrians, which means that it needed to be heavy duty. Architect, Tilman Riechert, commented: “We asked the general contractor to come up with a decking solution that could withstand an average load of 250kg/m2


.”


Eric Durand of Roofmart, the contractor in question, added: “Tilman was looking


18


for solutions that would avoid him specifying tropic hardwoods. Initially, he wanted to try heat-treated pine, but was not happy with the results of the initial trials. The quality of the heat-treated ash we were delivered was first class; he was won over by both the aesthetic appeal of the ash, with its characteristic grain, but also its dimensional stability and long lengths.”


The heat-treated American ash, which was supplied by Pennsylvanian company, Bingaman and Son Lumber Company, undergoes a thermal modification process that permanently alters the woods chemical and physical properties. This limits the ability of the wood to absorb moisture, making the surface more dimensionally stable and less prone to warping. The process also removes the nutrients in the wood that offer a food source for insects and wood- destroying fungi, thereby dramatically increasing the service life of the wood.


Maintenance needs are also reduced thanks to the process.


Commenting on the choice of wood, Tilman added: “We believe the ash, with its long wood fibre, will offer greater resistance to wear than pinewood.” The outcome will in fact been seen; due to the installations marine environment, the impact of weathering from the sun, rain and sea spray will be monitored over time.


Laid on a traditional system of boarding joists to allow the insulation membrane directly under the wooden decking to be well ventilated, the boards were also nailed, rather than screwed, to create a more aesthetically pleasing effect.


The American Hardwood Export Council’s (AHEC) European Director, David Venables, said: “The Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilisations is a superb example of the use of newer technologies of hardwood


www.tomorrowsflooring.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74