This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
energy wise ■ Humidity Soaks Up


Energy Savings AC units work harder in warm, wet weather


BY JOHN DRAKE COOPERATIVE ENERGY ADVISOR


A


bove normal rainfall and unusual temperatures in July and August made this summer a strange one, to say the least.


While it would be easy to assume the oddball weather would result in lower air conditioning costs, there’s something you should know. High temperatures aren’t the only factor that can affect your summer energy bill; humidity is also a major culprit.


If you spent more than 20 minutes outside this summer, I’m sure you noticed there was no shortage of moisture in the air.


Those high humidity levels make your air conditioner work harder and here’s why: If you have central air conditioning, ducts carry warm air over the evaporator coil in the cooling system. If you have a portable air conditioner, air flows through the grilles in the front panel.


In either case, refrigerant in the evaporator coil extracts heat from the moving air. But this cool coil surface also encourages condensation to take place, as moisture from the room air reaches its dew point. This process of condensation releases heat, which must be removed by the air conditioner. Higher humidity leads to more condensation, and more condensation produces more heat that the air conditioner has to remove. This increases your electrical costs.


If it seems odd that condensation releases heat, just think about getting out of the swimming pool and how the evaporation of water from your skin cools you off. Water condensation, on your evaporator coil or


anywhere else, is just the opposite. Heat is released wherever water condenses.


You can reduce the cost of air conditioning by following these steps to reduce the humidity in your home:


• •


Be sure your dryer is vented to the outdoors


Avoid drying clothes on an indoor clothes line


• Cover pots when cooking •


Use exhaust fans in your bathroom and kitchen





If you don’t have exhaust fans in your bathroom and kitchen, consider having them installed





If you have a crawl space, be sure any bare dirt is covered with a plastic ground moisture barrier


Other than lowering your electric bill, there’s one more good reason to reduce the humidity in your home: Less humidity means less chance of mold and mildew growth.


To learn more about ways to reduce your electric bill, visit EnergySavers. gov or TogetherWeSave.com, or call Choctaw Electric at 800-780-6486. We are happy to help you find affordable ways to save energy. ■


John Drake is your Choctaw Electric Cooperative energy use specialist. For questions about your energy usage, please contact Drake or Mark Zachry at 800-780-6486, ext. 233.


ENERGY EFFICIENCY Tip of the Month


Like homes and other businesses, farms of all types can lower their electricity bills by turning off or reducing use of lights and small equipment in outbuildings. Timers and sensors can help, too. Regular cleaning, maintenance, and seasonal tune-ups help keep larger equipment running at top efficiency.


SOURCE: E SOURCE


inside•your•co-op | 13


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160