This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
W


hen most people think car racing, they think NASCAR—and with good reason. NASCAR racing is one of the most popular spectator sports in the world, with annual attendance of over 3.6 million rabid race fans. Stars such as Tony Stewart, Jimmy Johnson and Michael Waltrip grace the sports pages and televisions each sum- mer weekend across the country.


Most NASCAR fans know their beloved sport has its roots in the rural south, where local legends made a name for themselves running moon- shine from the “revenuers” during the Prohibition era. While those days are long past, today’s NASCAR is the pinnacle of stock car racing that begins in local communities like Tulsa, Lawton and Ada, Okla. Each Saturday night, thousands of fans flock to venues throughout the state to watch their local heroes jump in a souped-up car, roll onto the high-banked oval tracks, and spit dirt and exhaust fumes into the air as they compete to see who is the fastest person in a racecar.


Starting Small


While NASCAR teams might have budgets in the millions, local four- wheeled gladiators spend less—in most cases substantially less. Racers such as Jeremy and Jacob Lucas from Chelsea, Okla., started their search in a local junkyard.


“I built my car from parts I scrounged at the junk yard,” Jeremy said. Brother Jacob went a different route and purchased his racecar from a


friend. “I used to work the pits for a friend. He sold me his car so he could


upgrade to a newer car,” he said.


The brothers, along with family and friends, have been hauling their cars on flatbed trailers to the Salina High Banks Speedway in Salina, Okla., each summer Saturday evening for the past year.


They pull out the lawn chairs and wrench on the cars. A family gather- ing—punctuated by short bursts of racing action—ensues as the kids run around and play in the pits and parents chat, adjust tire pressures, or change a busted water hose. “These cars don’t go all that fast, but when you are out on the track racing with your buddies, they sure are fun,” Jacob said. Other race teams spend a bit more money. The higher-end teams have race trailers pulled by semi trucks. They roll in, park in the pits, and set up a mini race shop complete with motorized tool boxes, air compressors, and satellite TV. Yet even the bigger-budget teams are family oriented.


A Family Affair


Harli White, an 18-year-old racer from Lindsay, Okla., and a Rural Electric Cooperative member, is supported by her parents and friends. Her grandfather, father and uncles all used to race stock and sprint cars, and now White is leading the charge. “My family has always raced and when I got old enough, I wanted to race too,” she said.


White started racing in 2008 at age 12 but was sidelined at her very first race by a freak accident. Her racecar overturned and caught on fire, burn- ing more than 50 percent of her body. White spent 21 days in the ICU


26 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP


Go Fast


By James Pratt and Turn Left


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160