This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Table Talk


THE


LIBERTY taste of


Above: The Liberty Theatre has kept prices low and entertainment high for nearly 100 years, however the snacks often steal the spotlight. Photos by Grant Leatherwood


By Mitch Steichen T


o many residents in Carnegie, Okla., the Liberty Theatre is a staple of daily life. It is as com- mon as the fried catfi sh in Georgia’s Country Kitchen or the town’s Annual World Championship Domino Tournament. To the fi rst-time visitor however, the theater is a stroll back in time. The Liberty Theatre sits on Main


If viewing the digital edition, click the image above to watch “Hollywood Flicks and Hometown Franks,” an Oklahoma Living magazine original video on the Show Dogs. Download the free digital edition from www.ok-living.coop.


Street in downtown Carnegie, easily found by its marquee which features neon-lit Lady Liberty herself. Behind its glowing façade, the oldest continually operating movie theater in Oklahoma is busy entertaining movie-goers. “This theater was built in 1915,” own- er and operator Jerry Applewhite said. “My parents started renting and running it in 1952 and I took an interest in it. In 1972, I bought the theater from the original owner’s wife, who was 96 at the time. So it’s only had two owners all this time.”


WATCH! Click on the icon to watch this Table Talk Video. 30 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP


Applewhite has worked enthusiasti- cally to create a fun and customer-fo- cused atmosphere for all ages, and started doing so with a few renovations. After he took over the business, he found the only way to keep the movie


theater open was to have more than one screen. So he purchased the adjoining building and added two screens. During his renovations however, Applewhite has done his best to keep the building’s history intact.


“The west part is all original, although the seating has changed,” Applewhite said. “Believe it or not, there were 616 seats in the original auditorium. Now it seats 220. We also converted the vaude- ville changing rooms at the front into bathrooms, but kept their original decor.”


Its age and decor are not the only unique parts of the Liberty Theatre’s his- tory. In 1970, Applewhite began serving gourmet chili hot dogs, or Show Dogs, as they are called at the theater’s conces- sion stand. Since then, he has perfected his recipe with help from Jim’s Coney Island in Tulsa. “We grind our own spices, we use good, all-beef Oscar Mayer wieners, and we steam the hot dog buns,” Applewhite said. “We use Oscar Mayer because they don’t have a smoky fl avor; that way they have a nice bite to them because of the spices. But I try to let the chili do the talking.”


Continued on Page 33


The Liberty Theater has been entertaining movie-goers since 1915. Photo by Mitch Steichen


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166