This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
EFFICIENCY Coffee Makers Use More Energy than You Might Think


the machine off between 20 minutes and four hours after the last batch is brewed. The most common time lapse between brewing and shut-down is two hours. To save energy, invest in a maker that allows you to manually program the auto shut-down, and set it for the shortest time, according to your coffee- drinking habits. • Most coffee makers consume


more electricity while they’re keeping the pot warm than they do to brew the beverage. Even if your machine auto- matically powers down after two hours, turn it off once you’ve had your fill of coffee. There’s no sense spending elec- tricity to warm coffee that you’re going to pour down the drain later. • It takes less energy to reheat a


It might surprise you to learn the


coffee maker in your kitchen uses more electricity than your refrigerator or washing machine. If you’re one of the millions of Americans who rely on a cup of hot Java to jump-start each day, consider these energy-saving tips:


• Don’t just turn your coffee


maker off when you’re finished with it; unplug it. Coffee makers continue to use electricity as long as they are plugged in, even if the power is off. • Even the most basic drip coffee


makers usually are equipped with an automatic power-down function to shut


RECIPE Sweet Corn Chowder


3 slices bacon, chopped or 1” piece of salt pork 1 med. onion, diced


2 cups peeled, diced fresh potatoes 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper


3 cups sweet corn kernels 2 cups milk


In a heavy pot, cook and stir the bacon/salt pork until crisp. Add 1 med. onion and cook over low heat until soft. Add diced potatoes, salt, pepper, and enough cold water to cover. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10-15 minutes until the potatoes are just tender. Add the sweet corn kernels and a bit more water if needed. Return to a boil and simmer for about 10 minutes. Stir in milk and heat through.


4 August 2013 VVEC Power Circuit


cup of coffee in a microwave oven than to leave the coffee maker’s warming tray turned on or to brew a new batch. • Single-serving “pod” coffee


makers have no warming tray and brew coffee quickly, which reduces energy costs. Environmentalists, however, criticize the technology because most of the pods – small, plastic containers of ready-to-brew coffee – are disposable rather than reusable.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166