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President's Report


Dan White Board President


Loyalty is a prized virtue – to


country, family, even the schools we attend. We keep those ties strong throughout our lives. Southwest Rural Electric


Cooperative also has loyalties – to the members and communities it serves. Those connections are deep because north Texas and southwest Oklahoma is home – to the cooperative, its founders, its employees and board, and its members.


When you signed up for service with SWRE you became a member, not a customer. That’s because each of our


SWRE consumer-members owns a portion of the utility. SWRE is not just your electricity provider – it’s your company.


for distant investors on Wall Street. We exist to provide you with safe, reliable, and affordable electric service – and doing so in a way that makes things better for future generations. Because electric co-ops operate


has no need to increase revenues above what it takes to run the business


structure helps keep your electric bills affordable.


Because of SWRE’s deep roots in the area, the co-op cares about improving the quality of life. From support for county livestock shows, to


C.E.O.'s Report


Mike R. Hagy Chief Executive


The Annual Report for Southwest Rural in 2013 has encouraging trends, but many of our members still face major problems. By the nature of printing deadlines and annual report requirements, I am writing this annual report article in late June that will be read in the August newsletter, so some of the present situations may change. Our area farmers have


experienced several hard years of drought and crop reductions. In the last two years, much of the cotton and wheat crops have been disastered. Cattle herds were reduced as well in recent years due to drought and lack of hay. Although many of our


experienced average and above- average rainfall, much of our area in north Texas and southwest Oklahoma is still experiencing the lingering effect of drought. Ponds are still dry and lakes in our area are at dangerously


membership and participation in area chambers of commerce, to sponsorship of diverse community activities, SWRE invests in the places where you, the co- op’s member-owners, live and work. SWRE takes seriously its responsibility to provide electric service, but it also takes its community roles seriously, too. That’s why the co-op sends two high school juniors to Washington, D.C., every summer to learn about history and government, and sponsors an energy essay contest every year for 8th graders.


SWRE doesn’t participate in these activities simply because it’s nice to do, or even the right thing to do. The co-op does it because of loyalty to our members, our neighbors, our home – and a mission to make life better in the areas we serve.


C.E.O.'s Report


low levels. I hope that July has brought unusual moisture, but typically July is one of the hottest and driest months for our area.


On the positive side, our cooperative and area have been relatively free of the violent storms that devastated the central portion of Oklahoma. Three tornados in ten days that created tremendous damage and loss of life were unprecedented. Two of those tornados were EF-5s and the last one that hit the El Reno area was not only an EF-5, but also the widest tornado (2.6 miles) in the recorded history of the National Weather Service. Our hearts and prayers have gone out to the families who lost loved ones. Thousands of our neighbors in those areas are still experiencing the effects of lost homes and property. The outpouring of goods and donations for those victims from across the nation is a refreshing reminder that people still care about each other in our great country.


SWRE is currently implementing our automated meter reading program and is compiling mapping and inventory data to implement long- range engineering plans for projected


growth and reliability of service. The completion of these phases of automation will be the solid base for


future.


Although we have not experienced the explosive growth in the gas and oil industry as has happened in northwestern Oklahoma and portions of western Texas, there appears to be a lot of energy activity in portions of our service area. Diversity in the loads we serve is always welcomed because diversity tends to even out the usage when some segments of the economy are slumping.


Overall, the state of the cooperative looks stable, barring some unforeseen circumstances. Environmental, political, and regulatory issues still threaten to push up the price of affordable power, but our cooperative state and national leaders have been vigilant to defend our rural environment while keeping the price of producing electricity as affordable as possible for our members. We will do our best to “keep the lights on”, and provide the best service available through our vision of safety, service and satisfaction.


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