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August 2013


NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.


Energy strategy needed Continued from page 1.


erative electric bills. Realizing its mistake, Congress repealed the act in 1987. Yet because of the legislation, many electric cooperatives became deeply invested in coal. Today, coal accounts for about 74 percent of the power produced by G&Ts and 55 percent of all electric cooperative electricity requirements.


Just like 35 years ago, the Presi-


dent’s call for action has co-ops once again faced with shifting fuels—in this case, choosing natural gas or renewables over coal. However, in regions without access to natural gas pipelines, changing from coal to natural gas isn’t feasible. On the re- newables front, co-ops have emerged as leaders, adding “clean and green” power systems where it makes eco- nomic sense—such as solar photo- voltaic arrays in the Southwest and


wind farms across the Great Plains and Midwest. But the sun doesn’t always shine (clouds) and the wind doesn’t always blow, especially dur- ing periods of peak demand on hot, humid summer weekday afternoons or cold winter mornings below minus 22 degrees Fahrenheit when power is needed most. Keeping the lights on 24 hours a day, seven days a week requires traditional baseload generation—namely coal, nuclear, and hydro—as well as a full mix of fuels. (900001)


The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, on behalf of America’s electric cooperatives, will continue to urge the President and his administration to work with co-ops on a real “all-of-the-above” energy strategy to keep electric bills affordable for rural Americans.


Page 3


Free hot dog feed T


Hidden account number contest


Last month’s numbers went unclaimed.


They belonged to


Richard Graen and Virgil Roper. We have hidden two account numbers somewhere in the articles in this newsletter. The numbers will always be enclosed in parentheses and will look similar to this example (XXXXXX).


If you recognize your account


number, all you have to do is give us a call on or before the 8th of the current month and we’ll give you a credit on your bill for the amount stated.


This month’s numbers are worth $50 each. Happy hunting!


1 pound bacon, cut into thirds 1 pound smokies 1 stick butter


2 cups brown sugar Preheat oven to 375°F. Cut the bacon into thirds and wrap each


smokie. Place all the wrapped smokies in a single layer in a baking dish. Melt the stick of butter and add 1 cup of brown sugar; stir until mixed well. Pour the butter and brown sugar mixture on the smokies and bacon. Take the other cup of brown sugar and sprinkle evenly over the smokies. Bake them for about 15-20 minutes and then turn the heat up to 400°F for about 5 minutes or longer until the bacon becomes crispy.


houghts of a county fair bring back memories to many people of fun times—sack races, showing a calf, winning a blue ribbon, visiting with friends and the best tasting hot dogs in the world. Join us this year at the Woodward County Fair on Aug. 24 from noon until 1 p.m. for a free hot dog.


Bacon Wrapped Smokies with Brown Sugar and Butter


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