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CHIPPING


The ball lands only one-quarter of the total distance to the hole and rolls three-quarters of the way with a pitching wedge.


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et’s start our lesson with defining what a chip shot is and how it differs from a pitch. The chip is played close to the ground and the goal is to get the ball on the green and rolling like a putt as soon as possible. The ball has more ground time than air time. Conversely, the pitch has more air time than ground time. You’ll use it when you have a bigger obstacle to carry than green to work with. In the picture above I am playing a chip shot with a pitching wedge and I will land my ball only one-quarter of the total distance to the hole and the ball will roll three-quarters of the way. You can learn to hit this shot consistently with just a few simple drills and some focus on your set-up position.


Katherine Marren was named 2008 Teacher of the Year by the Northern California PGA, and has been recognized as an expert teacher by Golf for Women, Golf Digest, Golf Magazine, The San Francisco Examiner, The California Golf Guide and The AT&T Junior Golf Association. For lessons, call 831/620-8859 or email kmarren@quaillodge.com. NCGA members receive $50 off golf schools and club fittings. Short Game School Sched- ule (three-hour session): Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 20, Nov. 10.


66 / NCGA.ORG / SUMMER 2013


Look at the front of the ball.


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here is no other set-up position that looks like a chip (pictured above)— it is unique to this shot and helps you pinch the ball at impact for the correct spin, trajectory and run.


1 Set-up for Success • Chipping starts with a great


setup. Most golfers learn to get their weight forward on their front foot to hit a low chip, but they have trouble accomplishing this because they keep their head behind the ball. Remember to move your balance forward by get- ting your head over your front foot.


By Katherine Marren, Director of Instruction at the Quail Lodge Golf Academy


I love teaching chipping because it not only improves scoring and enjoyment of the game, but it can improve full-swing ball striking. A chip shot can be thought of as a mini golf swing. When you improve your impact with the ball in your chipping stroke, you are more likely to improve your full swing impact as well.


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