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65 58


Number There are 12 players who have set or tied course records with a 59 on a course with a par of at least 70. The lowest score shot on a course with a par of at least 70 is a 58. Pat Gould shot a 13-under 58 at Sierra Sage, and Adam Ichikawa posted a 12-under 58 at Poplar Creek.


Golf’s Magic Half Moon Bay “It was really nerve-wracking. I felt all the butterfl ies.” I


t was the round of LYN NELSON’s life, but she just couldn’t wait for it to end. Even for a former nationally ranked amateur, bogey-free rounds aren’t necessarily angst- free. They’re both thrilling and treacherous. Nelson began 5-under through fi ve holes on Half Moon Bay’s Old Couse, and climbed to 7-under through 10.


“It was one of those


days where you know something goofy is going to happen,” said Nelson, who began birdie-birdie- birdie-par-eagle. “I just couldn’t lose.” But as Nelson navigated


through the back nine, her round went from unbelievable to uncomfortable. “At that point, you just want to get the


round done,” said Nelson, who was the general manager at Half Moon Bay. “I wasn’t thinking course record. I was just thinking that this was my personal best. “It was really nerve-wracking. I felt all


the butterfl ies.”


Nelson survived thanks to some clutch saves around the green on the closing


Within Reach?


Looking to challenge a course record? These courses have the highest scores: Likely Place– 69; Bass Lake– 68; The Dragon at Nakoma Golf Resort– 68; The Sea Ranch– 68; Tahoe Donner– 68.


61 Stanford “It was like I was a spectator watching myself.” E


arlier this year, Stanford freshman MARIAH STACKHOUSE began a round 9-under through nine holes for an unfath-


omable 26 at Stanford GC. Playing in the Peg Barnard Invita- tional at her college team’s home course, Stackhouse eagled the fi rst and seventh holes, while picking up birdies on Nos. 2, 3, 4, 8 and 9. She buried two putts longer than 30 feet. “After I had the eagle on No. 7, honestly it was like I was


a spectator watching myself,” Stackhouse told the Stanford Daily after her 10-under 61. “I was just kind of like ‘what is going on?’” Stackhouse had 59 in her sights until she picked up back- to-back bogeys on Nos. 13 and 14. But she bounced back


44 / NCGA.ORG / SUMMER 2013


with birdies on Nos. 16 and 17 to card a 61 and break teammate Mariko Tumangan’s course record (set last year) by two strokes. She also lapped the fi eld by 10 shots for her fi rst collegiate win. “When you shoot 10-under,


which few people ever have, you really have to be able to stay in the present,” Stanford women’s golf coach Anne Walker said. “For her to go bogey-bogey, and then jump back with birdie-birdie tells me she was absolutely in the moment on every shot.”


holes, and posted the fi rst bogey-free round of her career, shooting a women’s record 7-under 65 at the Old Course. “It was almost more relief that it was


over, than celebration of what happened,” said Nelson, who played at San Jose State with LPGA Hall of Famers Juli Inkster and Patty Sheehan. “Of course, I’m very, very proud of it.” With one women’s record in the bag, Nelson took aim at Half Moon Bay’s other track, the Ocean Course. Feeling particu- larly confi dent about her game this day, Nelson declared to a friend, “I’m going to shoot 67.”


And then she did, setting the women’s Ocean Course record. She nearly matched her 65 on the Old Course, but closed with two bogeys in her fi nal four holes. “As you get toward the end of your


round, it means something,” Nelson said. “It translates from fun to an accomplishment or a goal. And then it’s like ‘Uh-oh.’ Now this counts.’’ “I remember the fi rst time I broke 70 and it was such a thrill. I can’t tell you how many times I was about to break 70 and I got in my own way.”


PHOTO: STANFORD ATHLETICS


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