This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The Making of Northern California’s Best Rounds “Where’s the first tee and what’s the course record?”


Oh,


to have the talent and gumption to ask that question. Course records are often an emotional statistic, and the conditions that give birth to them are as varied as the


landscapes of the 400-plus courses in Northern California. The NCGA tracks course records for the online course direc-


tory and for the annual Golf Course Directory Edition of NCGA Golf. Each fall, course operators are asked to verify the informa- tion listed, though updates are welcome any time of year. Often we are asked what constitutes a course record. Should


it be a tournament round played from the back tees? What about match play or conceded putts? The answer is always the same: It’s up to the individual course. A good barometer might be to ensure that the course is play-


ing to its established rating. The Rules of Golf provide this guidance: The term “course record” is not defi ned in the Rules of Golf. However, it is generally accepted that a record score should be rec- ognized as the offi cial “course record” only if made in an individual stroke-play competition (excluding bogey, par or Stableford competi- tions) with the holes and tee-markers in their proper medal or cham- pionship positions. It is recommended that a record score should not be recognized as the offi cial “course record” if a Local Rule permitting preferred lies is in operation. Many courses provide records from a variety of tees for both


men and women—an excellent idea that recognizes a variety of great rounds. What follows are a series of facts and brief vignettes that bring to life the course records at many of the region’s great courses.


“ 61 Del Monte


How do you shoot 61 twice? You miss the putt for 60 twice.”


T


he 11th hole at Del Monte GC is a straightaway par 4, just 331 yards from the blue tees, a tame No. 14 handicap. Its elevated tee provides a glimpse of the ocean, a panoramic view of the Monterey Bay. It’s the pic- ture you’ll fi nd on the front of the Del Monte scorecard.


But if the inside of that scorecard has you at 12-under through 17 holes, it looks a little different. Del Monte assistant pro ERIC


LIPPERT tied Nick Watney’s course record with an 11-under 61. But Watney—who went 8-under in one fi ve-hole stretch to break Ken Venturi’s 51-year-old record of 62 during the 2005 Callaway Invitational—didn’t have the opportunity that Lippert did. As golfers check in with him before


their rounds at the 6,365-yard, par-72 Del Monte, Lippert will often fi eld the same question. “They’ll say, ‘How could you pos- sibly bogey No. 11? It’s the easiest hole on the course!’” said Lippert, who estimates he has played 200 rounds at Del Monte while working there the last 10 years.


Lippert will nod his head in agree-


HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? These are the lowest 18-hole scores that are course records regardless of par or yardage: 46 (12-under) by Patrick Bauer at Fairgrounds; 48 (14-under) by John Arnold, Greg Silva and Ryan Thornberry at River Oaks.


42 / NCGA.ORG / SUMMER 2013


Course Record Tales


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76