This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ShagBag


Derek Ernst Captures First PGA Tour Title with Cinderella Week


D


erek Ernst woke up Monday, April 29 as the fourth alternate for


the Wells Fargo Champi- onship at Quail Hollow in Charlotte, N.C. He was ranked 1,207 in the world, and had made just two of seven cuts on the PGA Tour this season. The 22-year-old’s best finish in a PGA Tour event was tying for 41st at last year’s Frys.com Open. But then Ernst, who


played on the NCGA’s Morse Cup team as recently as last year, got the call that he was in the Wells Fargo Championship. And then the Fresno native opened with a 5-under 67, vaulting


into a share of the lead with the likes of Rory McIlroy and Nick Watney. And then Ernst hung


around the top of the leaderboard for the next two days in cold and rainy conditions with rounds of 71 and 72. And then the PGA Tour


rookie somehow leap- frogged Phil Mickelson, Lee Westwood, McIlroy and Watney down the stretch, before chasing down David Lynn on the final hole. Ernst drew a 192-yard 6-iron to 4 feet for birdie to force a playoff—one of just four birdies on No. 18 all day—and then clinched his career-changing victory by


Ernst at last year’s Pacific Coast Amateur


riffling a 3-iron to 15 feet. The win earned Ernst


more than $1.2 million, and gave the 2012 Q-School graduate a two-year exemp- tion on the PGA Tour. “The money is money,


it will come and go,” said Ernst, who closed with a 2-under 70. “But winning and having a job and play-


ing out here for the next two years, that’s what I want to do. I want to play out here, so that is the best part about this.” Ernst is now the fourth


NCGA alum who is an active PGA Tour winner, joining Watney, Matt Bettencourt and Kevin Sutherland.


U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Coming to CordeValle For the


latest golf news visit NCGA.org


C


ordeValle will conduct its first USGA champion- ship when it hosts the Senior Women’s Amateur from Sept. 21-26. The Robert Trent Jones Jr. layout in San Martin will set up between 5,894 and 5,968 yards, and play as a par 72. CordeValle has hosted the Frys.com Open since 2010, as well as the annual Gifford Collegiate Championship. CordeValle is also in line to host the 2016 U.S. Women’s Open. CordeValle marks the first U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur in Northern California since 2004, when it was played at Pasatiempo GC in Santa Cruz. Other Northern California sites hosting the event include Del Rio GCC in Modesto (1990), Monterey Peninsula CC’s Dunes Course in Pebble Beach (1968 and 1976) and Del Paso CC in Sacramento (1964). Ellen Port, 51, returns to defend her title, as she beat Jane Fitzgerald at Hershey CC’s West Course in Pennsylvania to become just the second player to win both the Senior Women’s Amateur and U.S.


12 / NCGA.ORG / SUMMER 2013


Women’s Mid-Amateur. Port is one of 10 players with at least five USGA women’s championships. Also in the field is Carol Semple Thompson, a two-time USGA Senior Women’s Amateur cham- pion who has won seven USGA championships. She is one behind the women’s record-holder JoAnne Gunderson Carner. The Senior Women’s Amateur is one of 13 national championships conducted annually by the United States Golf Association, 10 of which are strictly for amateurs. The 132-player field goes through 36 holes of stroke-play qualifying and six rounds of match play to determine a champion. It is open to female amateurs who have reached their 50th birthday by Sept. 21 and have a USGA Handicap Index that does not exceed 18.4. Volunteers are needed for the event. There is no cost, and the volunteer receives lunch, hat, shirt and jacket. Contact the club at 408/695-4590 for more information.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76