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SPOTLIGHT


SPOTLIGHT ON: KURT WENNER


American 3D street artist, Kurt Wenner, talks to Tomorrow’s Flooring Editor, Grace Holliday about how he tackles the various surfaces he works on, the materials and tools he uses, and gives an insight into how he creates his fascinating works.


Not only is Kurt Wenner credited with inventing the technique


of 3D pavement art, but also in instigating the introduction of the style into an official form of Sacred Art; one of his latest commissioned works was signed by The Pope himself. In less than a month he both designs and executes his art, and counts locations like the Grand Canyon and Southern Taiwan as past spots for his unique


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creations. Having left a job with NASA, where he worked as an illustrator of conceptual paintings of space, he is now based in the San Juan Islands, where he combines his love of classical art with his unique technique for the 3D.


GH: What is the method behind making the art appear 3D?


KW: The three-dimensional effect is due to perspective geometry. I started creating my particular perspective geometry by adjusting the proportions of the painted


forms to accommodate the viewpoints of the spectators standing at the base of the work. Unlike 17th century anamorphic works, such as church ceilings, the viewing angles are very wide in my compositions, and I started to use a curvilinear fisheye lens to document them.


My own geometry is different from other works, and I have not published it. It combines a logical use of linear perspective with a projection outward from the human eye. Other artists emulate my three- dimensional pavement works using a more


traditional geometry called “quadratura” that does not involve complicated calculations.


GH: What are the various mediums of flooring that you work on?


KW: As pavement art is done outside, the surfaces can range from asphalt to concrete to stone. Asphalt would be my preferred medium, because of the dark surface and its superior ability to hold the pastel. Smooth surfaces, such as marble, needed to be treated with a material to give it


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