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SAFETY It’s Extra-Important for Seniors to Keep Cool


The older we get, the more careful we need to be on the hottest days of summer. Even when kids and younger adults seem unfazed by a sweltering August afternoon, the heat can knock older folks right off their feet. Common health problems among seniors, including poor circulation, inefficient sweat glands, heart, lung or kidney dis- eases, and high blood pressure, can affect how an older person’s body deals with heat. In addition, people on multiple medicines, or who take diuretics or sedatives, may


not be able to sweat. And some seniors don’t feel hot on days when everyone else is sweating, so they may wear too many clothes without realizing the danger. Seniors can follow a few summertime strategies for keeping cool:


• If you don’t have air conditioning, ask a family member or friend to drop you


off for the day at a shopping mall, a library or a nearby senior center, where it’s air con- ditioned. Many senior centers provide transportation. • Ask your doctor if any of your medications interfere with your ability to cool


your body down when it’s hot. • Dress in light, cotton clothes instead of synthetics when the temperature climbs. • Drink plenty of cool water during the day, even if you don’t feel thirsty. Avoid alcohol and caffeine; they can dehydrate the body. • Listen to the weather reports. Stay indoors or go someplace cool when the fore-


cast calls for heat, humidity or high air pollution. • Ask a relative or a neighbor to check in with you every day during the summer, just in case you need some help if the


weather gets the better of you. Working with large appliances: If your air conditioner goes out, keep a few things in mind before you start poking around. Large appliances, such as air


conditioners, are responsible for almost 20 percent of consumer-product electrocutions each year. • Understand your electrical system — know which fuse or circuit breaker controls each switch, light, and outlet. • Make sure circuits are turned off before starting work and take measures to ensure they’re not turned back on while


working. • Use a circuit tester—always test before you touch.


RECIPE Summer Fruit Salad


1 29-oz. can peach slices, undrained 1 20-oz. can pineapple chunks, undrained 1 3&1/8-oz. box dry vanilla instant pudding mix 1 lb. strawberries, stemmed & quartered 1 banana, sliced 1/2 pint blueberries


1 bunch grapes (your choice what flavor) 1 - 2 Tbsp. sugar (optional)


In a large mixing bowl combine peaches, pineapples, and vanilla pudding mix, and mix until pudding is dissolved. Stir in strawberries, banana, blueber- ries, grapes, and sugar if desired. Chill.


4 July 2013 VVEC Power Circuit


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