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NFEC President’s Message


When you hear the thunder,


it’s too late to build the ark. I thought I would use this opportunity to update you on some issues that affect you on the local, state and national levels. As most of you know, Glenn English recently retired as the CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). Glenn served in that capacity for 19 years. Glenn did a tremendous job and I will miss his common sense way of phrasing the issues. I really appreciated him taking time from his busy schedule to be with us one last time at our annual meeting last year. Glenn did leave some big shoes to fill but I believe the NRECA board has found just the right person to do so. Jo Ann Emerson has been chosen to be NRECA’s fifth CEO since its founding in 1942. She is a nine term Congresswoman from the state of Missouri. She has really hit the ground running. I had the opportunity to meet her at a recent conference and was impressed with her understanding of our program and her high energy level. I believe she will do a good job representing us. On the local level, in the March 2013 issue


of “Sparks and Flashes” Scott Copeland, NFEC General Manager, wrote an article about our new headquarters building project. As Scott stated in the article, it has taken us several years of study and planning to get to this point. Te project is progressing and we are continuing to monitor it as we move forward. As the old saying goes “When you hear the thunder, it’s too late to build the ark.” Te old headquarters building has served us well but we have simply outgrown it. We didn’t want to wait until we were in a situation where we were completely out of room and had no other options before we started this project. If you missed it the first time, you can read Scott’s article in its entirety on our website at www.nfecoop.com under community and news. As I travel across the state and nation, I find other rural electric cooperatives and related


organizations are a lot like Northfork. We often have similar problems where we can benefit from one another’s experiences in trying to solve these issues. And we are all trying to deliver dependable power to our members at the lowest practical cost. But the similarities don’t stop there. I have found that other cooperatives nationwide, just like ours, are made up of caring individuals - people who grew up and live by the principle of neighbor helping neighbor. A good example of this is the recent formation


of the Touchstone Energy Cooperative Oklahoma Relief Fund. Oklahoma has recently been devastated by a series of very destructive tornadoes on May 19, 20 and 31. On hearing this news our co-op friends and neighbors from across the nation have come to the aid of the tornado victims. As of this writing, $150,000.00 in donations has been received with more on the way. Donations have come from a variety of sources - from individual co-op members to various organizations involved in the cooperative program. Our extended co-op family has really stepped up in an effort to help the Oklahoma tornado victims. As always, if you have any questions or comments do not hesitate to contact me. You are an important part of our cooperative and I look forward to seeing you at our 74th


annual meeting on August 17, 2013.


Jimmy Taylor President,


Board of Trustees


2012 Annual Report Page 3


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