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Eyes On...


Eyes On...


Cally Law met with Crestron’s Terry Haynes to discuss the company’s recent entry into the luminaire market with CLED, a range of LED downlights that replicates halogen’s colour and dimming curve.


A1 - We know Crestron as an AV control company, when did lighting enter your portfolio? Terry Haynes – Although we’ve only just entered the luminaire arena with the CLED range we have had lighting control gear within our portfolio for a long time. At Crestron our ethos is Integrated by Design, moving away from individual components and becoming more interested in holistic systems and solutions. We see that as the most efficient way to control a building, monitor and manage energy and present the best value and use of time to clients. Lighting has always been an important factor in this approach.


A1 - Why have you decided to enter the luminaire market? TH - We’ve always had lighting control, keypads, sensors and touch screens but the thing that was missing was the light source. Since Part L was introduced there


have been many retrofit light source manufacturers who have claimed to perfect 230v LED dimming. Almost all other manufacturers making dedicated light engines like ours simply chose to use a 0-10v signal, meaning extra cabling and increased labour costs. As demand for retrofit lamps grew, so did their presence on supermarket shelves, replacing the 50mm halogen lamp. We then became the first port of call for resolving the issues around dimming as these products began to appear on Crestron projects. We take pride in providing solutions so moved into the market, seeking to perfect 230v dimming. That’s where my time with Crestron began. My challenge was to develop an LED fitting that would sit comfortably in a Crestron integrated building. After a thorough R&D process we can now present a range of LED luminaires that dim from 100-1% without flickering and also warms while


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