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Emergency Lighting


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Image below and left: Brilas LED by Emergency Lighting Products (ELP)


lighting as they are extremely resilient and can withstand impact and vibrations better than most other lighting devices and maintain function in challenging situations. The devices provide simple cost effective solutions for any location needing reliable low power lighting in the event of a power failure. The units are compact and stand- alone. They incorporate intelligent control of battery charging and constant current drive to the LED. There is also a separate output to power a small indicator LED showing the battery charge status. Harvard Engineering offers the device as both a standalone product and also a one–stop package solution alongside a power pack and LED module. Emergency Lighting Products Limited (ELP), has recently launched a new range. Brilas LED luminaires incorporate the latest high brightness white LEDs and provide in excess of 120 lumens in mains or emergency operation. The unique design provides a very wide ‘batwing’ intensity distribution ensuring excellent spacing possibilities for emergency lighting installations. The elegant design is also available with a ‘hanging blade’ exit sign option without sacrificing the IP65 rating. The small dimensions of the product make the design not only elegant but also discrete. In addition Brilas is available with full Dali control, reporting functions and self-test if required. Without proper maintenance emergency lighting would become useless, as it is vital that all emergency signs are luminated in the event of a power outage. Emergi-Lite have launched some new software, called Naveo. This software is designed to allow users to control the entire emergency lighting installation, inspection and maintenance process remotely using a desktop computer, tablet or smart phone. Naveo provides an overview of and also the control of all emergency lighting systems at any place 24/7. It also saves valuable time and there is no unnecessary


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checking of each device. Key advantages of the software include; time saving in both planning and maintenance, a continuous overview (day and night) of all monitored buildings, it allows for replacements to be installed before faults can occur and the software also generates an automatic list of replacement parts including their article numbers. If a problem or fault is found, Naveo also sends email or text alerts to users increasing planning efficiency and building safety.


“Naveo informs you of what site to visit, what you should take, and what actions are required – ensuring time and resources are planned efficiently” says John Thompson, Sales Director, Emergi-Lite. This is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to emergency lighting products but it shows just how diverse the sector is and that there really is a system to suit every need. With new online monitoring systems and low maintenance devices it is clear that the future holds less need for the arduous job of checking each device by hand. These devices may go unnoticed by most, and may not even be the most beautiful of light fittings, but they really do their job well. We all hope that we will never need these devices but if we do find ourselves in a power cut we will be happy in the knowledge we can exit the building safely.


Contact


Cooper Lighting and Safety T: +44 (0) 1302 303200 W: www.cooper-ls.com


Harvard Engineering T: +44 (0) 113 383 1000 W: www.harvardeng.com


ELP T: +44 (0) 1403 786601 W: www.elp.uk.com


Emergi-Lite T: +44 (0) 113 281 0600 W: www.emergi-lite.co.uk


www.a1lightingmagazine.com


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