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Office Lighting


illumination of room areas. The indirect component enables users to experience the room‘s peripheral areas and effectively promotes an awareness of the room in its entirety.


“The luminaire retraces the layout of the Working 9-5


With most office based professionals spending an average of eight hours a day at their desk, lighting the working environment can be a huge challenge.


Top image: Selux Stan Hema Right: Office environment Below: Meeting area


Founded in 2008, the Stan Hema agency are experts in brand strategy, brand design and brand communication. Last year they moved to new (almost 440m2) office premises in Berlin-Kreuzberg. The environment in a marketing agency is lively to help encourage creativity, although concentration is essential. Good visibility is also important, as is an atmosphere that promotes well-being. Stan Hema were looking for a light tailored to the needs of the people and the space. It was lit using the M36 LED light system from Selux. The M36 enables precisely this fine tuning of lighting to its users and the room architecture. The LED linear system, which has a width of just 36mm, can be configured like a modular construction kit. Using just a few basic profiles, high-efficiency LED boards in the light colours 3000K or 4000K and specially developed optics, it is capable of covering a particularly wide range of application areas.


At Stan Hema, the M36 was installed in the form of continuous light lines in accordance with the room geometry. The minimalist design language of the M36 enables it to be integrated effortlessly into the room while, at the same time, the LED light lines define the fabric of the rooms. In the agency‘s central working area, the seamless light profiles appear to hover virtually freely, suspended across a length of nearly eighteen metres. A separately switchable direct/ indirect component and microprism diffusers enable compliance with high office requirements for anti-glare and for uniform


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rooms with impressive subtlety while at the same time demarcating the individual volumes of the functional areas. The indirect light makes the room brighter or darker without impairing the incidental daylight at all. And finally interaction between all these light components creates what are for us ideal visibility conditions, regardless of whether we are working at a digital screen or just using pen and paper” explains Andreas Weber, Partner/Design at Stan Hema. “In contrast to our old offices, the light in our new office space is a distinct benefit.”


The Berlin architect Thomas Bendel was


responsible for fundamentally refurbishing the office space, which is housed in a


historic building used by Paramount Film AG in the 1920s. In close consultation with his customer, he has succeeded in creating a spacious ambience that is full of character. Despite redesigning the floor, wall and ceiling areas, as well as changing the room formation, the original style of the building (eg its striking, convex facade wall) has been preserved. The individually made, built-in furniture forms a single family due to its common, modern, reduced design language. And like the furniture, the lighting solution also follows the principle of objectness within the space, thereby becoming a supporting part of the design concept.


Contact


Selux Lighting T: +44 (0)1926 833455 W: www.selux.com


Thomas Bendel T: +49 (0)30 69536811 W: www.thomasbendel.com


Stan Hema T: +49 30 23 25 76 20 W: www.stanhema.com


www.a1lightingmagazine.com


A1


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