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VOLUME 28 - NUMBER 3 Products for EMS & OEMs THE GLOBAL HI-TECH ELECTRONICS PUBLICATION March, 2013


Juki Celebrates 75 Years of Global Innovation and Quality


Geron Ryden, Director of Marketing, Juki Automation Systems, Inc.


turers in Tokyo invested in the corpo- ration and commenced operation as “TOKYO JUKI MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION.” Juki focused on sewing machine technology as well


J


New conformal coating prod- uct from Chemtronics stars in this month's Electronics Man- ufacturing products section.


Page 22 How IMET


Quadrupled Sales, Still Growing


Philadelphia-area EMS pro - vider IMET has quadrupled sales in 4 years; and see how Cogiscan and Juki have part- nered to provide cutting-edge placement machines.


Page 18


This Month's Focus:


Measurement Test and


Detecting counterfeit devices, 3D X-ray inspection, daisy- chained dog bones for process testing, and highly accelerated test screenings are all part of this month's Special Focus on Test & Measurement.


Page 50


Juki, celebrating 75 years, in new headquarters in Tokyo’s Tama City. The company implemented a Japanese comprehensive building plan that received an “A” rating for environmental efficiency.


World’s Largest Fiber Optic Network at Sandia


Albuquerque, NM — Sandia Nation- al Laboratories has become a pioneer in large-scale passive optical net- works, building the largest fiber opti- cal local area network in the world. The network pulls together 265 buildings and 13,000 computer net- work ports and brings high-speed communication to some of the labs’ most remote technical areas for the first time. And it will save an esti- mated $20 million over five years through energy and other savings and not having to buy replacement equipment.


Sandia expects to reduce energy


costs by 65 percent once the network is fully operational. Fiber offers far more capacity,


is more secure and reliable and is less expensive to maintain and oper- ate than the traditional network that uses copper cables. An optical local area network


(LAN) gives people phone, data and video services using half-inch fiber optic cables made of 288 individual fibers, instead of the conventional 4- inch copper cables. Copper cables used to fill up underground conduits and required steel overhead racks of connecting cable, along with distri- bution rooms filled with separate frames for copper voice and data ca- bles. The fiber distribution system uses only part of the conduit and needs only a 2- by 3-foot cable box. “The frames go away, and the


walls are bare and the tray empties,” said senior engineer Steve Gossage, who has spent his 36-year career at


Continued on page 6


uki Corporation was founded in December 1938 when approxi- mately 900 machinery manufac-


as surface mount technology (SMT) mounting and assembly systems. It has built a reputation as a world leader in both areas. The firm now supplies 170 countries with sewing equipment and related products, rep- resenting 67 percent of the compa- ny’s overall sewing machine revenue.


Juki recently shipped its 25,000th SMT placement machine, reaching a milestone in the electronics industry. The global headquarters is located in Tokyo, Japan, with subsidiaries worldwide. Juki Corporation strived to cre-


ate new values from the first day of operation through “Monodzukuri” (the art of product-making) and the ongoing invention and evolution of technologies. Today, the company is effectively advancing business re- forms on every operational front from development and manufacture to sales and marketing. Juki Corpo- ration’s goal is to thrive in the 21st century as a strong global enterprise. As part of its commitment to


providing quality products, the Juki Group carefully considers the envi-


Continued on page 19


NewPhotonics Material for Big Data Apps


San Francisco, CA — A major step in photonics, using a new type of poly- mer material to transmit light in- stead of electrical signals within su-


IBM scientist Roger Dangel holds a prototype waveguide


made of the new material in the Binnig and Roher Nanotechnolo- gy Center in Rueschlikon, Switzerland.


Photo credit: IBM Research


percomputers and data centers has been jointly unveiled by Dow Corn- ing and IBM scientists. The new sili- cone-based material offers better physical properties, including ro-


Continued on page 30


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