This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TTG Toolkit On Tour ttgdigital.com/on-tour


Scenes from Manchester and Glasgow events TTG On Tour heads north Table Talk: The Travel Visa Company


Sign up for TTG On Tour in March


TTG On Tour 2013 continues with Cardiff (March 4), Bristol (March 5), Cheltenham (March 6) and Exeter (March 7).


Among the suppliers confirmed for March are AMResorts, Rail Europe, PortAventura, Japan Tourist Board, Mark Warner, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment, Expedia and the Tunisian National Tourist Office, with more names to follow.


Table host: Ray Ward, managing director Venue: Manchester


Ward starts his presentation by explaining just what his company does. He describes how The Travel Visa Company supplies visas for countries across the world, with China, India and Russia being particularly popular. Although the firm is now


the preferred supplier for both Thomas Cook and Tui Travel, Ward emphasises that the service is still available for independent agents. Cruise is a notoriously confusing sector when it comes to visas, says Ward, with some lines handing out wrong or old information. Ward says that the company


Cardiff here we come ■Sign up at ttgdigital.com/on-tour 30 21.02.2013


takes the liability away from agents. “If there is anything wrong, we’ll deal with it,” he adds.


Ward’s company pays commission either in cash or Love2shop vouchers and all agents need to do when a client comes in with a visa issue is give them a Travel Visa Company card. The company charges


around £30 for visiting an embassy on clients’ behalf and £25 for the US ESTA, which includes the $14 application fee.


The firm also deals with business visas as well as working holiday visas for Australia. The Travel Visa Company has more than 500 followers on Twitter and Ward says he attends as many conferences as possible.


Our February series continued with shows in Manchester and Glasgow, when we gave out prizes aplenty and everyone went home that little bit more knowledgeable


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56