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products to change the Clubbing venues rely on the lighting systems they


install to create an impact that appeals to visitors. Given the intense atmosphere of most clubs, lighting systems need to be able to match the fast pace of the music and add excitement to the venue. For a recent project in Brisbane, Australia, Clay Paky’s laser-like beam Sharpys were installed at a state-of-the-art nightclub, The Met, which is located in the city’s Fortitude Vally. The nightclub is an incredible purpose-built nightlife venue that was looking to provide visitors with an incredible show of lighting technology in its ‘Main Room’.


Four Clay Paky Sharpys were used in total for the project, providing a lightweight, moving light that can create a pure, bright beam that is highly energy efficient. To make the most of these effects, two Sharpys were positioned at the top of the onstage LED screen in the club and two are located either side of the DJ booth. The installation has been really well


received, with the team at The Met being really enthusiastic about their new installation; “Their beam is awesome and I love their colours and their speed,” says Pete Smith, The Met’s Technical Director. “Everyone is amazed with the lighting effects and the kids refer to them as ‘those searchlight things’ as they are astounded at the amount of light that comes out of such a small fixture.” The Sharpys from Clay Paky offer a total of fourteen different colours and seventeen gobos, allowing lighting designers to play around with the


shape of the beam and create incredible mid-air effects. Appearance in clubs is everything, and luckily the Sharpy is available in a shiny mirror-finish chrome version so that rather than detracting from the appearance, the products add glamour to sets while making lights less invasive. For the brand new Vegas Dance Club in Switzerland, Lighting Designer Frank Alofs from Audiotech KST AG specified a magnificent moving light rig from Robe. The concept was based around LED moving lights so that the rig not only looked the part but also offered a sustainable, value for money solution. A keen user of Robe products for the last two years, Alofs made the decision to use twelve ROBIN LEDBeam 100s, eight DLX Spots and four LEDWash 300s at the centre of the lighting rig. These were rigged on circular trussing in the roof of the building and around the underside of a balcony to bring together the spherical design of the room. The small size of the LEDBeam 100s meant that they were ideal for rigging under the balcony in the club, where their bright beams switch between illuminating the roof above the main dance floor and swooping down onto the packed crowds.


The finished installation gives the venue a perfect atmosphere, and the eight DLX Spots used come pre-programmed with 237 colours, including a selection of different colour temperature whites from 2,700 to 8,000K, providing a whole host of opportunities for their use. Over in Germany, Madjid Djamegari, Head and General Manager of the GIBSON nightclub, wanted an international technology brand to create a lighting installation that would meet the venue’s high standards. Djamegari turned to Martin Professional’s


Left Page, Top: Clay Paky Sharpys at The Met nightclub in Brisbane, Australia Left Page, Bottom: Martin Professional fixtures used in GIBSON, Germany. Below: Robe fixtures at the Vegas Dance Club, Sweden.


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