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News & Business LITE Ltd Illuminates Bradford Council’s City Hall


When the out-of-date lighting used at Bradford Council’s City Hall needed updating, LITE Ltd were contracted to replace the mixture of fluorescent, sodium, mercury and metal halide lamps with energy saving LED lighting, brightening City Hall’s iconic 220ft tall clock tower.


Using LITE’s LED lighting scheme has reduced energy consumption on the clock tower from 12.8 kW to 2.4 kW. Not only does the scheme drastically increase lamp life, the LEDs have also reduced annual CO2 emissions from 12,815 to 2,062kg. Relighting the clock tower has significantly


reduced the Council's costs for cleaning, maintenance and frequent lamp changes, as the previous positioning of the roof-mounted flood lights required specialist mechanical equipment and qualified engineers for any lamp change or other maintenance. LITE’s fully LED solution uses high level Philips Color Kinetics ColorBlasts to provide a combination of rich, saturated, wall washing colour and colour changing effects for the clock face backlighting. These are linked to the long throw, low level, ColorReach floodlights to provide split diffuser light combination that is ideal to highlight the four external faces. The whole LED RGB colour change lighting is coordinated by a DMX Pharos lighting controller within the clock tower.


DW Windsor’s LED Handrail Specified at Divinity School, St John’s College, Cambridge


The team at DW Windsor is delighted to have been involved in the redevelopment of Divinity School, Cambridge. Completed in 1879, the Neo-Tudor building is present in a high profile location and all aspects of the refurbishment needed to suit the quality of the building’s original design. AMA Architects won a competition to redesign and


refurbish the Grade II listed building and, alongside the College’s own maintenance team, decided that the refurbishment should include some modern new enhancements to the building to render it suitable for teaching and research. DW Windsor’s Garda LED handrail was specified, supported through stanchions to open up the dark Victorian stairway, with the exception of the basement flight, which was wall-mounted. DW Windsor’s award- winning illuminated handrail Garda bathes the stairwell in a welcoming warm white light at 3000K, with asymmetric distribution to concentrate the light onto the stairs where it is needed, helping to transform the staircase.


XL Video Works Wonders with Robbie Williams


In order to create a stunning show for the three day Robbie Williams’ tour at London’s O2 Arena, XL Video supplied scenic LED plus projection and camera/IMAG systems, including some of their newest products. More than 2000 of XL’s new Pixled FX-200 LED


spheres were put to good use for the shows. These were made up into a series of oval shapes measuring between 2.5 and 4 foot in diameter, and then rigged onto a set of handrails built by Tait Technologies. The structure flew in from the ceiling to meet a scenic bridge across the stage, creating a colourful element of the set. A large playback projection system featured six


of XL’s brand new Barco HDQ-2K40 40K projectors. These were a success on their very first outing with XL, offering an impressive 40,000 Lumens output with a 2K resolution. Phil Mercer, Group Head of Concert Touring for


XL Video, said: “As is typical of our long-standing relationship with Robbie Williams and his production team, we are always looking to keep the show state-of-the-art by using new video technology”.


Photos by Simon Niblett, use courtesy of IE Music


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