This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
HR Focus


Is social media helping or hurting job candidates?


A third (34%) of hiring managers who currently research candidates via social media said they have found information that has caused them not to hire a candidate. That content ranges from evidence of inappropriate behaviour to information that contradicted their listed qualifications:


• Candidate posted provocative/ inappropriate photos/info – 49%


• There was info about candidate drinking or using drugs – 45%


• Candidate had poor communication skills – 35%


• Candidate bad mouthed previous employer – 33%


*Statistics compiled by www.careerbuilder.com


chance that something you do or say on a social media site can actually help your chances in landing a job. According to the study, 29% said that they have hired someone because something they saw on Facebook or Twitter boosted their opinion of them as a person. The most cited ways that social media made a good impression include showing a good personality, conveying a professional image, showing a well-rounded candidate, displaying creativity, and reinforcing qualifications.


If some of this comes out sounding like mixed signals, that’s because there are many fine lines here. In terms of landing a job with these social media hounds, you have to have a well-rounded personality, but not be too into the booze. You have to be creative but also professional.


The best advice is to use it to your advantage. Just cut out the bad stuff, and overplay the good stuff. Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder, said: “Job seekers should be mindful of what potential


Social media stats* Which sites are employers frequenting the most?


Facebook - 65% LinkedIn - 63% Twitter - 16% Other – 17%


employers can learn about them online. If you choose to leave social media content public, tailor the message to your advantage. Filter out anything that can tarnish your professional reputation and post communications, links and photos that portray you in the best possible light.”


Finally, if you want to be a little edgy with your social media presence – it


looks like Twitter is the place to do it. While 65% of the hirers said they look at Facebook and 63% said they look at LinkedIn, only 16% use Twitter in their social media background checks.


Josh Wolford is a Staff Writer for WebProNews. To read more by Josh, visit www.webpronews.com or follow him on Twitter @joshgwolf.


43


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58