This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Sports Lighting


Sports News


We take a look at how sports facilities have been updating their lighting schemes to encourage us to spring into action.


When London was awarded the opportunity to host The Olympic Games this year, many were hopeful that this would turn us into a country of athletes and keen sportspeople. Now that the Olympics are just around the corner, sports facilities are ready and waiting to welcome the masses.


New sports facilities and renovations have been opening across the country in the wake of Olympic fever. One such building, The Royal Commonwealth Pool (known locally as the Commie), opened in Spring 2012 following an extensive £37M refurbishment and renovation programme by The City of Edinburgh Council. The venue, managed by Edinburgh Leisure, houses a 50m pool, state-of-the-art gym, three fitness studios, a café and a children’s play area. Riegens were contacted to supply luminaires for the lighting upgrade at the facility. Specified by the consultants for the project, the team designed bespoke fittings that would sympathetically blend with the original features in the Category A-Listed building. Riegens also supplied a variety of fittings from its standard product range.


The Riegens luminaires, installed by UK Building Support Services company Arthur McKay, were fitted with Tridonic’s EM PRO


28


emergency lighting control units. Engineered to meet the demands of modern lighting schemes, the system is based on the DALI protocol for emergency lighting and can therefore be integrated into other DALI control lighting systems or managed as a stand-alone system. Fittings from Riegens standard range of


products included Concido downlighters for the changing rooms, Mirac and Arbos recessed luminaires and Evac LED bulkheads for ancillary areas, along with Casino wall for stairwells and Linus to provide optimum light distribution in corridors.


Lighting fixtures for sports facilities need to work hard, as Mike Attard, Managing Director at RIDI UK explains; “The sports hall environment is just as demanding on its fixtures and fittings as it is on the athlete and, when the pace increases, you need to be sure that your lighting is up to the job.” RIDI UK has recently provided the lighting for the indoor tennis centre at the University of Warwick. Constructed to minimise impact on the environment, but also to meet the exacting standards of the Lawn Tennis Association, the centre features natural ventilation for environmental efficiency and the ABR-SPORT luminaire from RIDI for high performance, robust lighting.


The ABR-SPORT is fitted with a specially manufactured white steel reinforced, crossblade louvre that complies with a German sports hall lighting standard - DIN 18032 Part3 - for which RIDI says there is no UK equivalent. “At RIDI, our research and development team in Stuttgart has spent over twenty years testing sports luminaires to destruction, in order that they can be certified to meet the German DIN 18032 ball impact standard – something that is recognised in the US market but not here in the UK,” explains Attard. “This rigorous impact test fires a handball at high speed from a cannon device, directed at different points of the luminaire. The luminaire is allowed to deform, but no component – including the lamp – should work loose or break.”


This standard makes the ABR-SPORT a perfect solution for indoor racket sports and ball games. Positioned to achieve optimum light levels over the courts, the luminaires are installed in suspended and cambered runs between the courts using RIDI’s TRAS purpose-made trunking system. In recent years lighting has played a central role in the appearance of sports facilities, adding to the excitement of certain events. Euro 2012 has drawn attention to National Stadium, Warsaw, which was host


www.a1lighngmagazine.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84