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sac’ed on me ended up getting a win. 17. ... Kxh7 Mr. Carnall was right to take the


bishop. The gift was not free but I would’ve had even more of a devastating follow up if the gift was refused. (If 17. … Kh8, then still 18. Ng5.)


18. Ng5+ (punch 2) This is a typical second punch after


Bxh7+. That’s why Black could’ve pre- vented the sac by ... Be7 or ... h7-h6.


18. ... Kg6 18. ... Kg8 is no better after 19. Qh5


Re8 (escape route) 20. Ba5! White will sac another bishop but will get lost mate- rial back and have a strong attack.


19. Qg4 (punch 3) My queen on g4 sets up strong discov-


ered attacks by the knight, such as Nxe6 attacking Black’s queen. Instead of ... Kf6, Black’s best move here is ... f7-f5. White usually can keep the discovered attacks by simply moving straight back to g3. In this game though, g3 is controlled by Black.


rsn-+-tr-+ +pwq-+pzp- p+lvlp+k+ +-+-+-sN- -+-zP-+Q+ zP-+-+-+- -zP-vL-zPPzP tR-+-tR-mK-


After 19. Qg4


19. ... Kf6? This move is easy for the computer to


find but not for a human even without time pressure. To make Mr. Carnall feel better, I didn’t find the best move myself. I missed the mate in two here which is Rxe6+. Instead I fell in love with Nh7+ forking the king and rook.


20. Nh7+ Ke7 21. Nxf8 Kxf8 Houdini suggested Rac1 or Qxg7


instead of Nxf8. After 21. Qxg7 (or first 21. Rac1 and


then 22. Qxg7) White, slightly down in material, has a strong attack. After 21. Nxf8 White is also somewhat down mate- rial—with no real attack.


22. Qh4 Kg8 23. Rac1 Qd7 24. Qg4 Bf8 25. Rc3 Bd5 26. Rg3


(see diagram top of next column) 26. …f5 27. Qg6 Nc6


uschess.org


rsn-+-vlk+ +p+q+pzp- p+-+p+-+ +-+l+-+- -+-zP-+Q+ zP-+-+-tR- -zP-vL-zPPzP +-+-tR-mK-


After 26. Rg3


After 27. ... Qf7 there is no attack, while the endgame clearly favors Black. 28. Rh3 Ne7 29. Qh7+ Kf7 30. Qh5+ Ng6? If 30. ... g6, then 31. Qh8, followed by


32. Rh7+. And if 30. ... Kg8, White had a choice: continue repeating moves with 31. Qh7+, or keep attacking with 31. Ree3.


31. Rg3 Ke8 32. Rxg6 Kd8 33. Rc1


r+-mk-vl-+ +p+q+-zp- p+-+p+R+ +-+l+p+Q -+-zP-+-+ zP-+-+-+- -zP-vL-zPPzP +-tR-+-mK-


After 33. Rc1


The knight pin and capture really secured my thought that I had the lead. My dad said Rc1 was his favorite move in this entire game, other than the bishop sac. I did Rc1 because that would cut off his king’s escape route. Black can’t do a rook trade at this time because of the immediate checks. Besides, White is up an Exchange and a pawn.


33. ... e5 34. Ba5+ Ke8 35. Rxg7+ Bf7 36. Qh8


r+-+kvl-wQ +p+q+ltR- p+-+-+-+ vL-+-zpp+- -+-zP-+-+ zP-+-+-+- -zP-+-zPPzP +-tR-+-mK-


After 36. Qh8 Houdini found 34. Bg5+ (mate in four).


I also missed 35. Re6 mate. Again that Chess Life — July 2012 45


good old lesson to never fall in love with the first move you see. I didn’t see Black’s powerful 35. ... Bf7. But I managed to pin his bishop with Qh8.


36. ... Rc8 37. Rxc8+ Qxc8 38. h3 Qc1+ 39. Kh2 Qf4+ 40. Rg3 Qxd4 41. Bb4


-+-+kvl-wQ +p+-+l+- p+-+-+-+ +-+-zpp+- -vL-wq-+-+ zP-+-+-tRP -zP-+-zPPmK +-+-+-+-


After 41. Bb4 I managed to deflect Black’s attempt to


force a draw and finally got back to attacking the pinned bishop. Black is hopeless.


41. ... Qxf2 42. Qxf8+ Kd7 43. Qxf7+ Kc6 44. Qc4+ Kb6 45. Rg6+ Ka7 46. Bc5+ b6 47. Rg7+, Black resigned.


To conclude, I’ll present, in brief, Andrew’s “Summary of Learning”: * Even a lower-rated player can succeed with The Sacrifice. * You don’t have to calculate all the way through. If you see reasonable chances, go for it. * Consider all forcing moves first. * Don’t settle for small material gains.


.


Send in your games! If you are unrated or were rated


1799 or be low on your Chess Life (CL) label, then GM Lev Alburt invites you to send your most instructive game with notes to:


Back to Basics, c/o Chess Life PO Box 3967 Crossville, TN 38557-3967


Or e-mail your material to backtobasics@uschess.org


GM Alburt will select the “most


instructive” game and CL will award an autographed copy of Lev’s newest book, Fresh Look at Chess (by Lev Alburt and Al Lawrence) to the per- son submitting the most in structive game and annotations. Do not send games with only a


few notes, as they are of little instruc- tive value and can’t be used. Writing skills are a plus, but instructiveness is a must! Make sure your game (or part of it) and your notes will be of interest to other readers.


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