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sporting back


YOUR INJURY Low back pain affects the elite athlete as much as the inactive ‘slouch’ potato but there are diferences in the nature of the pain, the diagnosis and expectations regarding the rate of recovery. Recovery is often faster when dealing with physically fit people due to the underlying level of fitness. Low back pain often results from an imbalance between the back and the stomach muscles. This may lead to instability or incorrect functioning of the lower part of the spine. Strengthening these muscles and correcting any imbalance is therefore very important. Loss of stability in your spine can lead to microscopic damage to the surrounding soft tissues so it is particularly important to address this problem quickly to minimise damage.


YOUR REHABILITATION PROGRAMME This programme has specific exercises to help stretch and strengthen muscles which may be weak. It is really important to ensure the exercises are performed with good technique and good postural control as this will help prevent possible problems in the future. Take care not to progress too quickly and you should be pain-free at all times. We have given suggested sets and repetitions, but everyone is different so your practitioner may give guidance that is more specific to you.


MAKE SURE TO WARM UP AND COOL DOWN If muscles are tight, weak or injured, it is particularly impor- tant to warm up (unless advised otherwise by your practi- tioner) with a fast walk or a gentle jog at a pain-free pace for 5 minutes before you start your exercises. This increas- es your circulation and helps prepare the muscles for the activity to come. When you have finished your exercises, end the session with a 5 minute gentle walk or slow jog to allow your heart rate to slow down gradually.


YOUR REHABILITATION PROGRAMME This exercise programme has specific exercises to help stretch and strengthen tight muscles as well as improve the


HOME EXERCISE PRODUCTS


Therapy Bands - unlooped http://spxj.nl/zA8cs3 Therapy Bands - looped http://spxj.nl/zg9k8V Gym Balls http://spxj.nl/xwcImU


Cervical area of spine (C1-C7 upper section)


Thoracic area of spine


(T1-T12 mid section of spine)


Lumbar area of spine (L1-L5 lower


section of spine) - area affected in low back pain


Image showing the three main curves of the spine


stability of the core muscles used to maintain a good posture during sporting and daily activities. It is important to ensure the exercises are performed with good technique as good postural control is important at all times and will help prevent possible problems in the future.


All products are accompanied by video demonstrations online. For other products visit the PhysioSupplies website http://spxj.nl/ykRdi5


Wobble Boards http://spxj.nl/zlM2aM Ice Packs http://spxj.nl/A5tglZ Exercise Mats http://spxj.nl/yvsAOw


Hand Weights http://spxj.nl/xHElIQ Home Fitness http://spxj.nl/wxL1ae Orthopaedic Supports http://spxj.nl/y2aePC


The information contained in this article is intended as general guidance and information only and should not be relied upon as a basis for planning individual medical care or as a substitute for specialist medical advice in each individual case. To the extent permissible by law, the publisher, editors and contributors accept no liability for any loss, injury or damage howsoever incurred (including negligence) as a consequence, whether directly or indirectly, of the use by any person of the contents of this article.


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© 2011 Primal Pictures Ltd


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